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  • 7-November-2018

    English, PDF, 536kb

    Stemming the Superbug Tide in Italy

    Resistance proportions for eight antibiotic-bacterium pairs in Italy have increased in recent years, from 17% in 2005 to 30% in 2015, and could go up to 32% by 2030, should current trends in antibiotic consumption, population and economic growth continue into the future. Resistance proportions in Italy were substantialy higher than the OECD average in 2015 (17%).

  • 7-November-2018

    English, PDF, 511kb

    Bloccare lo Tsunami di Super-Batteri in Italia

    In Italia, la proporzione di infezioni resistenti agli antibiotici è cresciuta da 17% nel 2005 a 30% nel 2015 e potrà raggiungere il 32% nel 2030, se il consumo di antibiotici, la crescita demografica e la crescita economica dovessero continuare a seguire gli stessi trend. La proporzione di antibiotico resistenza in Italia è sostanzialmente superiore rispetto al 17% di resistenza media nei paesi OCSE nel 2015.

  • 23-November-2017

    English

    Italy: Country Health Profile 2017

    This report looks at the state of health in Italy.
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  • 15-February-2017

    English

    Sustained reforms are essential to reinforcing inclusive growth in Italy

    Italy is slowly emerging from a deep and lengthy recession, helped by a range of structural reforms – such as the Jobs Act – and accommodative monetary and fiscal policies, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 388kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Italy

    In Italy, there are two main categories of nurses requiring a university bachelor’s degree: Registered Nurses (RN) and Registered Paediatric Nurses (RPN). Once a Registered Nurse or a RPN, nurses can pursue further education in the form of a Master’s or Doctoral degree, which is more oriented towards an academic career.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 311kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in Italy

    Entry to medical education in Italy follows the completion of high-school education and the grades obtained in a national exam, and it is subject to a numerus clausus (i.e., annual quota) set by the Ministry of Education, University and Research. It takes about six years for students to complete the first medical degree.

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  • 7-July-2015

    English

    OECD Health Statistics 2015 - Country Notes

    Specific country notes have been prepared using data from the database OECD Health Statistics 2015, July 2015 version. The notes are available in PDF format.

  • 15-January-2015

    Italian

    Persistenti disparità regionali nella qualità dell’assistenza sanitaria tra le regioni italiane secondo il nuovo rapporto OCSE

    L’Italia ha migliorato notevolmente la qualità dell’assistenza sanitaria negli ultimi decenni, ma deve affrontare le permanenti forti disparità che permangono tra le regioni, secondo un nuovo rapporto OCSE.

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  • 15-January-2015

    English

    Still too much variation in health care quality across Italian regions, says new OECD report

    Italy has significantly improved the quality of health care in recent decades but needs to tackle the wide disparities that remain between regions, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 15-January-2015

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Care Quality: Italy 2014 - Raising Standards

    This report reviews the quality of health care in Italy, seeks to highlight best practices, and provides a series of targeted assessments and recommendations for further improvements to quality of care. Italy’s indicators of health system outcomes, quality and efficiency are uniformly impressive. Life expectancy is the fifth highest in the OECD. Avoidable admission rates are amongst the very best in the OECD, and case-fatality after stroke or heart attack are also well below OECD averages. These figures, however, mask profound regional differences. Five times as many children in Sicily are admitted to hospital with an asthma attack than in Tuscany, for example. Despite this, quality improvement and service redesign have taken a back-seat as the fiscal crisis has hit. Fiscal consolidation has become an over-riding priority, even as health needs rapidly evolve. Italy must urgently prioritise quality of its health care services alongside fiscal sustainability. Regional differences must be lessened, in part by giving central authorities a greater role in supporting regional monitoring of local performance. Proactive, coordinated care for people with complex needs must be delivered by a strengthened primary care sector. Fundamental to each of these steps will be ensuring that the knowledge and skills of the health care workforce are best matched to needs.
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