Reports


  • 25-April-2016

    English

    Mobilising investment in clean energy infrastructure

    Investment in clean energy infrastructure needs to be scaled up to support the broader development, economic and climate agenda. This will require leveraging private investment, however investment in this area remains constrained by barriers, including market and government failures. This page describes what tools the OECD provides to governments to create an enabling environment for investment flows to clean energy infrastructure.

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  • 18-April-2016

    English

    High-Level Advisory Group on Anti-Corruption and Integrity

    The OECD Secretary-General’s High Level Advisory Group on Anti-Corruption and Integrity (HLAG) is composed of ten experts on anti-corruption and integrity from a wide variety of professional backgrounds and regions. The members have provide their advice to the Secretary-General independently, without any vested interests in the outcome.

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  • 15-April-2016

    English, PDF, 683kb

    The OECD Code of Liberalisation of Capital Movements: OECD report to the G20, April 2016

    This OECD report was presented at the G20 meetings in Washington on 13-15 April 2016. The report provides an update on recent developments concerning the OECD Code of Liberalisation of Capital Movements, in particular the launch of the review of the Code.

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  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Environmental Lending in EU Eastern Partnership Countries

    This report presents an overview of existing environmental credit lines in the EU’s Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine), which are mostly supported by International Finance Institutions and donors and disbursed by local commercial banks. Lessons learned from this type of credit-line implementation provide useful insights for spurring the banking sector into financing green investments.

  • 12-April-2016

    English

    Analyses and reports

    From numbers to meaning – what stories do the data tell us? Access our major reports covering global aid and development flows plus major in-depth studies by sector, type of aid and recipient groups.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Governance of Regulators' Practices - Accountability, Transparency and Co-ordination

    Regulators operate in a complex, high-risk environment at the interface between the public and the private sectors. They often share some responsibilities for the sectors and industries they regulate with other public institutions. And yet, if the lights go out, tap water stop running, trains break down or phones stop working, they are often held to account. In this challenging environment, the governance of regulators is critical. The role of the regulator and how it co-ordinates with other public institutions, the powers it is given and how it is held accountable for exercising these powers are key elements of a governance architecture that needs to be carefully crafted and appropriately implemented if the regulator is to succeed in combining effective regulation with a high level of trust. This report looks at the way in which four regulators – the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), the Australian Energy Regulator (AER), Portugal’s Water and Waste Services Regulation Authority (ERSAR) and the UK Office of Rail and Road (ORR) – have addressed these governance challenges. The report identifies approaches to implement accountability, transparency and co-ordination and helps identify some lessons that can help guide how these principles can be translated into practice.

  • 6-April-2016

    English

    OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas - Third Edition

    Trade and investment in natural mineral resources hold great potential for generating income, growth and prosperity, sustaining livelihoods and fostering local development. However, a large share of these resources is located in conflict affected and high-risk areas. In these areas, exploitation of natural mineral resources is significant and may contribute, directly or indirectly, to armed conflict, gross human rights violations and hinder economic and social development. The OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas provides step-by-step management recommendations endorsed by governments for global responsible supply chains of all minerals, in order for companies to respect human rights and avoid contributing to conflict through their mineral or metal purchasing decisions and practices. The Due Diligence Guidance for minerals may be used by any company potentially sourcing any minerals or metals from conflict-affected and high-risk areas, and is intended to cultivate transparent, conflict-free supply chains and sustainable corporate engagement in the minerals sector.

  • 1-April-2016

    English

    Making the Most of Public Investment in the Eastern Slovak Republic

    The Slovak Republic joined the European Union in 2004, the Schengen area in 2007 and the euro in 2009. These events, coupled with decentralisation reform and the creation of administrative regions, have brought significant change. While overall growth has been impressive compared to OECD countries overall, benefits have not accrued equally across the country. Public investment could potentially improve regional conditions and attract private funding, but governance bottlenecks stand in the way. This case study shows that the main obstacles to effective public investment are linked to high local fragmentation as well as the challenges national and subnational administrations face in designing and implementing investment strategies that correspond to local needs. Drawing on a detailed set of indicators, the study provides recommendations to address these challenges and make the most of public investment in the Slovak Republic.

  • 19-March-2016

    English

    Policies for Sound and Effective Investment in China

    Since the start of the economic reform process in the 70s China has been able to generate a large volume of investment, both from domestic and foreign sources. This high volume of investment was instrumental in sustaining strong economic growth and related improvements in living standards. However, this growth model is not longer sustainable. Returns on investment have fallen, excessive capacity is plaguing several sectors and the negative externalities have been very onerous, notably in terms of environmental degradation and rising income inequality. A key objective of the Chinese government is therefore to move the economy towards a more balanced, sustainable and inclusive growth path as envisaged by the 13th Five-Year Plan. In this adjustment process, the country is seeking new approaches for smarter, greener and more productive investment. This will require mutually reinforcing reforms to improve investment planning, rebalance the role of government and market forces, mainstream responsible business conduct and encourage greater private investment, especially in green infrastructure. China’s growing role as an outward investor may act as catalyser for the required reforms at home, as Chinese private and state-owned enterprises have to adopt internationally recognised practices and standards .

  • 16-March-2016

    English

    Whistleblower Protection

    Encouraging employees to report wrongdoing, and protecting them when they do, is an important part of corruption prevention in both the public and private sectors.

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