By Date


  • 7-June-2017

    English

    Determinants of digital technology use by companies

    This paper contributes to our understanding of digital technology usage by assessing changing patterns in the use of hardware and software and identifying the extent to which various plant characteristics and policy environments correlate with ICT investment. The results suggest notable changes in the use of a number of digital technologies across countries between 2000 and 2012.

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  • 6-June-2017

    English

    OECD Week

    OECD Week 2017, that includes the Forum (6-7 June), the Meeting of the OECD Council at Ministerial Level (7-8 June), as well as other meetings, placed a central emphasis on "Bridging Divides" and on policies that could deliver a more inclusive globalisation, and, as such, respond to growing citizens’ concerns that globalisation has not benefitted fairly to all.

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  • 5-June-2017

    English

    Bridging divides in a post-truth world

    The 2017 OECD Forum takes place after a series of political upheavals few would have predicted scarcely twelve months ago. Divides have become more apparent between metropolises and capital cities on the one hand, and towns and villages on the other, between Millennials and pensioners, between the haves and the have-nots, between the best and the rest.

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  • 2-June-2017

    English

    Can we save our democracies from hackers?

    The first generation of those born into the internet age is already joining the workforce and yet the internet still manages to disrupt. The phenomenon of fake news is one of the by-products of digital transformation and it is worth taking a look at what is new, and not so new, and how it fits in to the rest of what some are calling the “post-truth world”.

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  • 2-June-2017

    English

    Re-booting government as a bridge to the digital age

    Digitalisation has already been under way for about half a century, yet it is only now that everyone is talking about a digital revolution. Why? One reason is the spread of faster and better connectivity. In 2013, about 80% of OECD countries had complete broadband coverage, fixed or wireless.

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  • 1-June-2017

    English

    Figures and feelings both count, as a matter of fact

    In Henrik Ibsen’s play, An Enemy of the People, a town is divided over whether or not to clean up the municipal baths following a water contamination report. But a doctor’s good intentions to save the town come up against special interests. In the end, the facts are rejected, the truth reshaped and the water is not cleansed. As for the doctor, he is cast out as the enemy.

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  • 29-May-2017

    English

    Corporate accountability is essential to human rights in the network society

    The truth is that human rights are not sustainable, or in some places even possible, in today’s networked society unless public and private actors take responsibility. Governments and corporations alike must commit to design, manage, and govern technologies in a manner that is consistent with international human rights standards.

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  • 10-May-2017

    English

    New technology still underused by businesses

    Businesses need to step up the adoption of cutting-edge technologies, materials and processes if countries are to reap their full potential in terms of productivity gains, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 27-April-2017

    English

    Fixing Globalisation: Time to Make it Work for All

    Recent years have seen a remarkable backlash against globalisation. The costs of increased openness and connectivity – including the consequences of trade and investment liberalisation – are weighted as never before against the benefits, with many voices advocating a slowdown or even a reversal of the global integration that has characterised the past three decades. While there are many economic, social and political reasons for this backlash, there is sufficient evidence showing that globalisation is leaving many people behind, particularly in the lower half of the income distribution, and especially in advanced countries. This backlash suggests that we need to act quickly to fix globalisation and make sure that its benefits are more equally shared. The consequences of a potential reversal of global integration could be dramatic: increased protectionism resulting in a net loss of wealth and opportunities and dangerous inward-looking policies that would put at risk many of the benefits achieved in the past decades.

  • 20-April-2017

    English, PDF, 8,736kb

    Discover the OECD Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation

    We cover a vast range of topics, developing evidence-based policy advice on the contribution of science, technology and innovation to economies and societies. From business dynamics and productivity to GVCs and the evolution of the digital economy, and from innovation for social challenges to alleviating excess capacity in heavy industries, we seek to provide new insights for policymakers. We also "go national" with in-depth reviews.

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