Reports


  • 26-October-2010

    English

    Egypt - Business Climate Development Strategy - OECD

    This assessment of Egypt's business climate identifies policy priorities and proposes specific reforms and actions to enable Egypt to achieve measurable improvements in its business climate.

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  • 5-October-2010

    English, , 1,569kb

    Inventory of investment measures taken between 16 February and 15 September 2010

    This report covers investment measures taken between 16 February and 15 September 2010. Information presented in this report has also been used for a joint report by WTO, OECD and UNCTAD, released on 4 November 2010, in response to the G20 Leaders' request for public reporting on their adherence to their trade and investment policy commitments.

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  • 23-September-2010

    English, , 342kb

    2010 Annual Meeting of the National Contact Points: Report by the Chair

    This document reproduces the Report by the Chair of the Annual Meeting of the National Contact Points (NCP) which was held in June 2010. This report reviews NCP activities as well as other implementation activities undertaken by adhering governments over the June 2009 - June 2010 period.

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  • 8-September-2010

    English

    Measuring Globalisation: OECD Economic Globalisation Indicators 2010

    This new edition of the OECD Economic Globalisation Indicators presents a broad range of indicators on trade, foreign direct investment, the economic activity of multinational firms, and the internationalisation of technology.

  • 7-September-2010

    English

    The OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises: Frequently Asked Questions

    Frequently asked questions concerning the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises.

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  • 26-August-2010

    English

    Trade and Economic Effects of Responses to the Economic Crisis

    The dramatic collapse in world trade in 2009 is, this report shows, mainly due to: the drop in demand for highly traded products; the drying up of trade finance; and the vertically integrated nature of global supply chains. Contrary to expectations, protectionist measures were relatively muted and did not play a significant part. In fact, because of their sheer size, stimulus measures may have had more impact on trade than direct trade policy measures Nevertheless, dollar for dollar, direct trade restricting measures have the most strongly negative impacts on growth and employment: a one dollar increase in tariff revenues results in a USD 2.16 drop in world exports and a USD 0.73 drop in world income. 

    The analyses presented here suggest that exit strategies from measures to deal with the crisis will be most effective in boosting growth and jobs if they first roll back measures that discriminate between domestic and foreign firms and those that target specific sectors. General demand stimulus measures and active labour market policies are preferable under current conditions. 

  • 16-August-2010

    English

    OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and Tax Administrations 2010

    The OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and Tax Administrations provide guidance on the application of the “arm’s length principle”, which is the international consensus on transfer pricing, i.e. on the valuation, for tax purposes, of cross-border transactions between associated enterprises. In a global economy where multinational enterprises (MNEs) play a prominent role, transfer pricing is high on the agenda of tax administrators and taxpayers alike. Governments need to ensure that the taxable profits of MNEs are not artificially shifted out of their jurisdictions and that the tax base reported by MNEs in their respective countries reflect the economic activity undertaken therein. For taxpayers, it is essential to limit the risks of economic double taxation that may result from a dispute between two countries on the determination of an arm’s length remuneration for their cross-border transactions with associated enterprises.

    After having been originally published in 1979, the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines were approved by the OECD Council in their original version in 1995. A limited update was made in 2009, primarily to reflect the adoption, in the 2008 update of the Model Tax Convention, of a new paragraph 5 of Article 25 dealing with arbitration, and of changes to the Commentary on Article 25 on mutual agreement procedures to resolve cross-border tax disputes. In the 2010 edition, Chapters I-III were substantially revised, with new guidance on: the selection of the most appropriate transfer pricing method to the circumstances of the case; the practical application of transactional profit methods (transactional net margin method and profit split method); and on the performance of comparability analyses. Furthermore, a new Chapter IX, on the transfer pricing aspects of business restructurings, was added. Consistency changes were made to the rest of the Guidelines.

  • 13-August-2010

    English

    Finance, business and the crisis

    Read about OECD efforts to help governments improve the domestic and global policies that affect business and markets in the wake of the global economic crisis.

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  • 23-July-2010

    English

    Poland: Key Issues and Policies

    The rapid growth of entrepreneurship and small firms has been one of the greatest successes in post-Communist transformation in Poland.  SMEs have greatly contributed to employment, investment and value added in the Polish economy.  However, key barriers to further growth remain in the business environment for SMEs and entrepreneurs.  This book sets out the current SME and entrepreneurship climate, reviews SME and entrepreneurship issues and policies at national and local levels, and provides observations and recommendations for improving and supporting entrepreneurship and SMEs in Poland.

  • 9-July-2010

    English

    Consumer Policy Toolkit

    The markets for goods and services have undergone significant changes over the past 20 years. Regulatory reform, global markets, new technologies and growth in the role of services in economic activity have driven the changes which, in many instances, have provided significant benefits to consumers. Relatively little attention has been paid to the challenges these developments have posed for consumers. More choice and more complexity in many markets have made it increasingly difficult for them to compare and assess the value of products and services. The challenges for consumers have raised similar challenges for the government authorities responsible for protecting them from unfair commercial practices and fraud.

    This book examines how markets have evolved and provides insights for improved consumer policy making. It explores, for the first time, how what we have learned through the study of behavioural economics is changing the way policy makers are addressing problems.

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