Publications & Documents


  • 28-May-2013

    English

    Interconnected Economies - Benefiting from Global Value Chains

    Global Value Chains (GVCs) have exploded in the past decade and refer to the international dispersion of design, production, assembly, marketing and distribution of services, activities, and products. Different stages in the production process are increasingly located across different economies, and intermediate inputs like parts and components are produced in one country and then exported to other countries for further production and/or assembly into final products. The functional and spatial fragmentation that has occurred within GVCs has significantly reshaped the global economic landscape, thereby raising some new major policy challenges for OECD countries and emerging countries alike: trade policy, competitiveness, upgrading and innovation and the management of global systemic risk.

  • 27-May-2013

    English

    Failing to close the stable door

    The recent scandal over the use of horsemeat in readymade meals that has shaken the entire European continent has revealed not only the complexity and opacity of our food supply chain, but also–and above all–the shortcomings of European food law.

    Related Documents
  • 24-May-2013

    English

    Stimulating Economic Growth through Knowledge-Based Investment

    Recent studies have shown that knowledge-based capital (KBC) is an important source of economic growth in many of the world’s advanced economies (much more so than R&D alone) and is positively correlated with real GDP per capita in a cross-section of these economies. This literature is still in its infancy and there is, as yet, no systematic discussion of KBC policy. This working paper makes an attempt to fill this gap.

    Related Documents
  • 23-May-2013

    English

    OECD-China co-operation in the field of international investment

    China is increasingly interested in further advancing its investment co-operation with the OECD. This is in large part due to the fact that China wants to attract more "quality" foreign direct investment (FDI) from OECD-based companies and the perception that the OECD could provide useful best policy practices and experiences for China.

    Related Documents
  • 23-May-2013

    English, PDF, 1,306kb

    China Investment Policy Update

    This paper examines China’s investment policy since the publication of the 2008 OECD Investment Policy Review of China and recommends that the Chinese government continue its efforts to liberalise and increase the transparency and predictability of the framework for both inward and outward FDI. OECD Working Papers on International Investment - No. 2013/1.

    Related Documents
  • 22-May-2013

    English

    International Regulatory Co-operation: Case Studies, Vol. 3 - Transnational Private Regulation and Water Management

    The world is becoming increasingly global. This raises important challenges for regulatory processes which still largely emanate from domestic jurisdictions. In order to eliminate unnecessary regulatory divergences and to address the global challenges pertaining to systemic risks, the environment, and human health and safety, governments increasingly seek to better articulate regulations across borders and to ensure greater enforcement of rules. But, surprisingly, the gains that can be achieved through greater co-ordination of rules and their application across jurisdictions remain largely under-analysed.

    This volume complements the stocktaking report on International Regulatory Co-operation: Rules for a Global World by providing evidence on regulatory co-operation in the area of transboundary water management and through the fast development of transnational private regulation. 

  • 16-May-2013

    English

    Intervention by Mr Sergio Arzeni at the Plenary session on “Small Business: the Heart of the Global Economy”

    Now all governments realise why SMEs and entrepreneurship matter: because they are the sources of new jobs.

    Related Documents
  • 13-May-2013

    English

    International Regulatory Co-operation: Case Studies, Vol. 2 - Canada-US Co-operation, EU Energy Regulation, Risk Assessment and Banking Supervision

    The world is becoming increasingly global. This raises important challenges for regulatory processes which still largely emanate from domestic jurisdictions. In order to eliminate unnecessary regulatory divergences and to address the global challenges pertaining to systemic risks, the environment, and human health and safety, governments increasingly seek to better articulate regulations across borders and to ensure greater enforcement of rules. But, surprisingly, the gains that can be achieved through greater co-ordination of rules and their application across jurisdictions remain largely under-analysed.
     
    This volume complements the stocktaking report on International Regulatory Co-operation: Rules for a Global World by providing evidence on regulatory co-operation in the framework of the Canada-U.S. Regulatory Cooperation Council, as part of EU energy regulation, under the Global Risk Assessment Dialogue, and in the area of prudential regulation of banks. The four case studies provided in this volume follow the same outline to allow for comparison.

  • 6-May-2013

    English

    Workshop: Management and leadership skills in high-growth firms (Warsaw, Poland)

    High-growth firms, i.e. enterprises that grow rapidly over a short period of time, have drawn the attention of policy makers because of the large number of jobs they create. While it is uncontested that high-growth firms account for most job creation, there are fewer certainties about the features and characteristics of these enterprises or on how best they can be promoted by policy.

    Related Documents
  • 2-May-2013

    English

    Forum on implementing due diligence in the 3Ts and Gold supply chains

    Participants in this multi-stakeholder meeting launched the Gold Implementation programme and advanced implementation of due diligence in the 3Ts supply chain to ensure that companies avoid contributing to conflict through their mineral or metal purchasing decisions and practices.

    Related Documents
  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 | 121 | 122 | 123 | 124 | 125 | 126 | 127 | 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 | 144 | 145 | 146 | 147 | 148 | 149 > >>