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  • 4-May-2016

    English

    Carbon emissions all at sea: why was shipping left out of the Paris Climate Agreement? Insights Blog

    A stern warning for climate change, and our health - Shipping brings us 90% of world trade and has increased in size by 400% in the last 45 years. Cargo ships, tankers and dry-bulk tankers are an essential element of a globalised world economy, but they are thirsty titans and they won’t settle for diet drinks. There are up to 100,000 working vessels on the ocean and some travel an incredible 2/3 of the distance to the moon in one year.

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  • 29-April-2016

    English

    Inclusive business can help solve the sustainability equation

    From the early 2000s, sustainability has emerged as a central policy-making consideration as climate change and population growth have heightened concerns about already-stretched natural resources.

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  • 27-April-2016

    English

    The Ocean Economy in 2030

    This report explores the growth prospects for the ocean economy, its capacity for future employment creation and innovation, and its role in addressing global challenges. Special attention is devoted to the emerging ocean-based industries in light of their high growth and innovation potential, and contribution to addressing challenges such as energy security, environment, climate change and food security.
     
    The report examines the risks and uncertainties surrounding the future development of ocean industries, the innovations required in science and technology to support their progress, their potential contribution to green growth and some of the implications for ocean management.  Finally, and looking across the future ocean economy as a whole, it explores possible avenues for action that could boost its long-term development prospects while managing the use of the ocean itself in responsible, sustainable ways.

     

  • 22-April-2016

    English

    Local growth and development: An era of new priorities

    Not so long ago, “globalisation” was a favourite paradigm in international business. It was a trend that began in the late 1970s and accelerated in the 1980s, when corporate takeovers were the order of the day and multinational companies fixated on maximising short-term profits and boosting share prices. One approach was “global sourcing”, also called outsourcing or offshoring.

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  • 19-April-2016

    English

    12th Annual Meeting: Creativity, jobs and local development (Venice, Italy)

    This year the Forum will focus on creativity, jobs and local development. We will examine how localities can support culture and creative industries as a source of knowledge and job creation and how the creative industry can act as a powerful driving force areas such as tourism, urban regeneration, and social inclusion.

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  • 18-April-2016

    English

    Outcomes from the High-Level Symposium on Excess Capacity and Structural Adjustment in the Steel Sector

    A High-Level Meeting on excess capacity and structural adjustment in the steel sector was convened on 18 April 2016, at the Palais d’Egmont in Brussels, co-organised by the OECD and the Belgian government.

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  • 18-April-2016

    English

    Illicit Trade - Converging Criminal Networks

    This report assesses the magnitude, flows and drivers of illicit trade and the illegal economy including: narcotics, human trafficking, wildlife, sports betting, counterfeit medicines, alcohol and tobacco. The negative socio-economic impacts that these markets have in consumer countries are as worrisome as the goverance gaps that are exploited in source countries. This report examines each illicit sector in terms of the geographic sources, destinations and key trade routes, the current trend of infiltration by organized crime networks, and good practices or future policy solutions with which to combat illicit trade within the various sectors.

  • 14-April-2016

    English

    Lending to SMEs and entrepreneurs is improving, but more diverse forms of financing are needed

    Financing for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) has turned the corner from the downswing seen during the global financial crisis, but overall credit conditions remain challenging and access to external finance continues to be much tighter for SMEs than larger firms, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Environmental Lending in EU Eastern Partnership Countries

    This report presents an overview of existing environmental credit lines in the EU’s Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine), which are mostly supported by International Finance Institutions and donors and disbursed by local commercial banks. Lessons learned from this type of credit-line implementation provide useful insights for spurring the banking sector into financing green investments.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Employment dynamics, young businesses and allocative efficiency

    In a period of sluggish employment growth and disappointing productivity trends in most OECD countries, the central role played by start-ups and young firms in creating jobs and bringing innovations to market acquires renewed importance in the policy debate.

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