Reports


  • 4-February-2016

    English

    Broadening the Ownership of State-Owned Enterprises - A Comparison of Governance Practices

    The State continues to remain an important shareholder in listed companies worldwide, especially among emerging economies, which rely increasingly on mixed-ownership models. With the benefit of hindsight and more recent examples, this book provides fresh perspectives on the motivation to list state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and the process it entails. Drawing from the experiences of five economies (People's Republic of China, India, New Zealand, Poland and Turkey), the book concludes that broadened ownership generally has a positive impact on the governance and performance of these companies. However, country practices show that the act of listing cannot guarantee that these companies are completely averse to State interests; and deviations from sound corporate governance practices, as enshrined in the OECD Guidelines on Corporate Governance of SOEs, can in some cases, raise concerns with regards to non-State shareholder rights, commercial orientation, board independence, conflicting State objectives, transparency, disclosure and more.
  • 11-December-2015

    English

    Understanding Energy Challenges in India - Policies, Players and Issues

    A combination of rapidly increasing energy demand and fuel imports plus growing concern about economic and environmental consequences is generating growing calls for effective and thorough energy governance in India. Numerous policy reforms over the past 20 years have shifted the country’s energy sector from a state-dominated system towards one that is based on market principles. However, with the reform process left unfinished, India now finds itself trapped halfway along the transition to an open and well-performing energy sector.India suffered from the largest power outage ever in late July 2012, affecting nearly half of the population. While this incident highlights the importance of modern and smart energy systems, it indicates that the country is increasingly unable to deliver a secure supply of energy to its population, a quarter of which still lacks access to electricity.
     
    Understanding Energy Challenges in India aims to provide an informative and holistic understanding of India’s energy sector to stakeholders in India as well as the broad public.The publication explores in detail the policies, players and issues of the country’s power, coal, oil and gas, renewables and nuclear sectors. It also highlights the key challenges India faces, challenges that must be resolved for the evolution of the fast-growing country’s energy sector towards a sustainable energy future and eventually critical for the prospects of the Indian and global economies.
  • 25-June-2015

    English

    Taxing Energy Use 2015: Key Findings for India

    Taxation is a key tool by which governments can influence energy use to contain its environmental impacts. This report provides a systematic analysis of the structure and level of energy taxes in OECD and selected other countries, including India; together, they cover 80% of global energy use.

  • 9-February-2015

    English, PDF, 94kb

    Going for growth 2015 - India

    This country note from Going for Growth 2015 for India identifies and assesses progress made on key reforms to boost long-term growth, improve competitiveness and productivity and create jobs.

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  • 30-November-2014

    English, PDF, 350kb

    India Policy Brief: Enhancing Agricultural Productivity and Food Security

    A major question for India concerns the agriculture sector’s contribution to national food security. India is the world’s second most populous country, and it has the largest number of farmers and rural population. About one-quarter of the world’s total food insecure people live in India.

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  • 30-November-2014

    English, PDF, 358kb

    India Policy Brief: Improving the Quality of Education and Skills Development

    India has one of the world’s fastest growing economies, but a lack of skills among the working population is one of the main bottlenecks to higher and more inclusive growth.

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  • 30-November-2014

    English, PDF, 429kb

    India Policy Brief: The Digital Government Imperative

    India adopted a broad-based strategic approach to e-government in 2006 through the National E-Governance Plan. The plan set out key priority areas such as the creation of shared data and service centres. However, these changes have so far had little effect on overall governance and citizens’ quality of life.

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  • 30-November-2014

    English, PDF, 384kb

    India Policy Brief: Encouraging Greater International Investment in India

    India is regularly mentioned as one of the top global destinations for international investment, but it ranks outside the top 10 recipients worldwide. International multinationals cite factors such as retrospective tax legislation and rulings, strict labour laws, slow decision-making at the sub-national level, and poor infrastructure.

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  • 30-November-2014

    English, PDF, 446kb

    India Policy Brief: Improving the Business Environment through Effective Regulation

    India began its regulatory reforms in the early 1990s, reducing state involvement through the privatisation of companies, by putting in place independent regulatory mechanisms to boost competition and private-sector-led growth, and to strengthen consumer protection. But the reform efforts lacked coherence and, more recently, have stalled.

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  • 30-November-2014

    English, PDF, 370kb

    India Policy Brief: Enhancing Global Value Chain Participation

    India’s foreign value added content of exports was 22% in 2009 (the second highest in the BRIICS after China), up from 10% in 1995, illustrating an increased fragmentation of production and integration into global value chains, into which India could integrate even better.

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