Publications & Documents


  • 23-March-2016

    English

    High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth: closing remarks

    Thank you for today’s inspiring and productive conversation. Many important points have been raised that will be very helpful in guiding the future work of the Commission. Three key messages have emerged.

  • 23-March-2016

    English

    High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth: opening remarks

    Our discussions today can help us identify clear, bold and actionable policies for better health workforce strategies. The OECD is delighted to join WHO and ILO in coordinating the work of the High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth. We stand ready to share our knowledge, tools, data and experience to ensure its success.

  • 23-March-2016

    English

    Launch of the UNSG High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth with Angel Gurría as co-vice chair

    Launch and first meeting of the Commission, Lyon, France. The meeting was chaired by H.E. Mr François Hollande, President of France and, H.E. Mr Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa.

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  • 16-March-2016

    English

    Pharmaceutical Pricing Policy project

    The policy study published by the OECD is based on six case studies, an extensive review of the literature, and analysis of relevant data. The report provides context for the analysis of pharmaceutical pricing policies in OECD countries, describes pricing policies employed by the OECD zone and assesses their impact.

  • 15-March-2016

    English

    Health Workforce Policies in OECD Countries - Right Jobs, Right Skills, Right Places

    Health workers are the cornerstone of health systems, playing a central role in providing health services to the population and improving health outcomes. The demand and supply of health workers have increased over time in all OECD countries, with jobs in the health and social sector accounting for more than 10% of total employment now in several OECD countries. This publication reviews key trends and policy priorities on health workforce across OECD countries, with a particular focus on doctors and nurses given the preeminent role that they have traditionally played in health service delivery.

     

  • 15-March-2016

    English

    Health workers with right skills in right places needed

    The number of doctors and nurses has reached record levels in the OECD. Countries should now reform their training and employment strategies to better respond to people’s changing health needs and also reduce their reliance on foreign-trained health workers from developing countries, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 317kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in the Slovak Republic

    In the Slovak Republic, students can access medical education after having completed high school and having passed a university entrance examination. Since 2003, Slovakian medical schools are under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Sport, which also determines the financial resources available to them.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 381kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in the Netherlands

    Following this medical degree, new medical graduates can apply to enter in four different types of post-graduate clinical training programmes that are of various length: general practice (lasting 3 years), more than 30 different medical or surgical specialties (lasting 4 to 6 years), public health specialty (lasting 2.5 to years), or nursing home specialist (lasting 2 years).

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 301kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Germany

    In Germany, there are two main categories of nurses, first level and second level. A majority of first level nurses are trained through a 3-year vocational training programme involving hospital-based training, and these nurses can go on to pursue further education and training to specialise within the hospital setting.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 311kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in Australia

    Entry to initial medical education in Australia can either occur directly following the completion of secondary school (entry to undergraduate medical education) or following the completion of a bachelor degree in any field (entry to graduate medical education). In 2014, 18 medical schools offered medical education programs in Australia.

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