Publications & Documents


  • 27-May-2015

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Care Quality: Portugal 2015 - Raising Standards

    This report reviews the quality of health care in Portugal, seeks to highlight best practices, and provides a series of targeted assessments and recommendations for further improvements to quality of care. The Portuguese National Health Service has responded well to financial pressure, successfully balancing the twin priorities of financial consolidation and continuous quality improvement. Even in the post-crisis years when GDP fell and health spending declined, improvements in quality of care continued. The need to reduce health spending has been met through a combination of structural reforms, and a well-designed suite of quality initiatives. Reforms around the purchasing and use of pharmaceuticals and medical devices have helped drive down costs, and Portugal has been innovative in how public funds are used to pay providers, increasingly basing payments on quality and efficiency. Important priorities for further work in the Portuguese health system do remain. Portugal will need to improve clinical processes and pathways, particularly in the acute sector. There is still room to improve efficiency, for instance increasing the share of generic drug consumption, and using the Portuguese health workforce more effectively, especially through expanded roles for nurses. Further structural reform is needed with an emphasis on shifting care out of hospitals into less-expensive community settings, and Portugal will also need to reflect on the strategic direction of the primary care system which, following an impressive reform, now risks developing into a two-tiered system with increasingly divergent levels of care quality. 
  • 12-May-2015

    English

    Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use: Country profiles

    This data visualisation provides specific country figures and policy recommendations about alcohol consumption in OECD countries. Please use the ‘+share/embed’ button to customize this tool for your country and language and to generate an embed code for your website.

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  • 12-May-2015

    English

    Launch of OECD report on Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use

    The cost to society and the economy of excessive alcohol consumption around the world is massive, especially in OECD countries. This report provides clear evidence that even expensive alcohol abuse prevention policies are cost-effective in the long run and underlines the need for urgent action by governments, said OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría, launching the report in Paris.

  • 12-May-2015

    English

    Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use - Economics and Public Health Policy

    Alcoholic beverages, and their harmful use, have been familiar fixtures in human societies since the beginning of recorded history. Worldwide, alcohol is a leading cause of ill health and premature mortality. It accounts for 1 in 17 deaths, and for a significant proportion of disabilities, especially in men. In OECD countries, alcohol consumption is about twice the world average. Its social costs are estimated in excess of 1% of GDP in high- and middle-income countries. When it is not the result of addiction, alcohol use is an individual choice, driven by social norms, with strong cultural connotations. This is reflected in unique patterns of social disparity in drinking, showing the well-to-do in some cases more prone to hazardous use of alcohol, and a polarisation of problem-drinking at the two ends of the social spectrum. Certain patterns of drinking have social impacts, which provide a strong economic rationale for governments to influence the use of alcohol through policies aimed at curbing harms, including those occurring to people other than drinkers. Some policy approaches are more effective and efficient than others, depending on their ability to trigger changes in social norms, and on how well they can target the groups that are most at risk. This book provides a detailed examination of trends and social disparities in alcohol consumption. It offers a wide-ranging assessment of the health, social and economic impacts of key policy options for tackling alcohol-related harms in three OECD countries (Canada, the Czech Republic and Germany), extracting relevant policy messages for a broader set of countries. 
  • 12-May-2015

    English

  • 29-April-2015

    English

    Health systems are still not prepared for an ageing population

    OECD insights blog: Francesca Colombo, Head of the OECD Health Division, discusses the issues related to health systems and an ageing population.

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  • 22-April-2015

    English

    Enhancing Translational Research and Clinical Development for Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias

    Accelerating innovation for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is a key challenge. An OECD workshop in November 2014 provided an international forum for all stakeholders to drive forward a change in the global paradigm in biomedical research and health innovation for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

  • 15-April-2015

    English

    OECD Guide to Measuring ICTs in the Health Sector

    The OECD launched a project on “Benchmarking ICTs in health systems”, a multi-stakeholder initiative to improve the availability and quality of health ICT data through the development of a robust measurement framework and comparable cross-national measures. This task was accomplished in 2013 with the publication of an OECD “Guide to Measuring ICTs in the Health Sector”.

  • 9-April-2015

    English

    Public-private Partnerships in Biomedical Research and Health Innovation for Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias

    This report looks at the roles and options of stakeholders (governments, regulatory agencies, academia, small and mid-size biotech companies, the pharmaceutical industry, and patient organisations) in public-private partnerships for product development in Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

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  • 13-March-2015

    English

    Better dementia care and a future cure require action today, says OECD

    The current policy approach to tackling dementia is socially and economically unsustainable, according to a new OECD report. Countries need to take action now to improve the lives of people living with dementia and their carers, prioritise public research on dementia, and improve the incentives for private investment in dementia innovation.

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