Publications & Documents


  • 15-April-2015

    English

    OECD Guide to Measuring ICTs in the Health Sector

    The OECD launched a project on “Benchmarking ICTs in health systems”, a multi-stakeholder initiative to improve the availability and quality of health ICT data through the development of a robust measurement framework and comparable cross-national measures. This task was accomplished in 2013 with the publication of an OECD “Guide to Measuring ICTs in the Health Sector”.

  • 19-March-2015

    English

    Dementia

    Dementia is a devastating condition for the people affected, their family and friends, and for health systems. Through its global reach and ability to bring together government and non-government perspectives, OECD is in a unique position to face up to the challenge.

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  • 13-March-2015

    English

    Better dementia care and a future cure require action today, says OECD

    The current policy approach to tackling dementia is socially and economically unsustainable, according to a new OECD report. Countries need to take action now to improve the lives of people living with dementia and their carers, prioritise public research on dementia, and improve the incentives for private investment in dementia innovation.

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  • 13-March-2015

    English

    Addressing Dementia - The OECD Response

    The large and growing human and financial cost of dementia provides an imperative for policy action. It is already the second largest cause of disability for the over-70s and it costs $645bn per year globally, and ageing populations mean that these costs will grow.

    There is no cure or effective treatment for dementia, and too often people do not get appropriate health and care services, leading to a poor quality of life. Our failure to tackle these issues provides a compelling illustration of some of today’s most pressing policy challenges. We need to rethink our research an innovation model, since progress on dementia has stalled and investment is just a fraction of what it is for other diseases of similar importance and profile. But even then a cure will be decades away, so we need better policies to improve the lives of people living with dementia now. Communities need to adjust to become more accommodating of people with dementia and families who provide informal care must be better supported. Formal care services and care institutions need to promote dignity and independence, while coordination of health and care services must be improved. But there is hope: if we can harness big data we may be able to address the gaps in our knowledge around treatment and care.
     

  • 12-March-2015

    English

    Big Data for Advancing Dementia Research - An Evaluation of Data Sharing Practices in Research on Age-related Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Dementia is increasing in prevalence, and to date has no cure or treatment. One element in improving this situation is using and sharing data more widely to increase the power of research. Further, moving beyond established medical data into big data offers the potential to tap into routinely collected data from both within and outside the health system.

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  • 4-March-2015

    English

    High-Level Policy Forum on Mental Health and Work: Bridging Employment and Health Policies - Closing Statement

    This Forum does not mark the end of a process. It was a key step aimed at sharing the main conclusions of our work on Mental Health and Work and to discuss where we stand, with the goal of connecting health policy makers and employment policy makers in order to discuss an issue that they can only solve together.

  • 4-March-2015

    English

    Fit Mind, Fit Job: From Evidence to Practice in Mental Health and Work

    Introductory remarks at the high-level OECD Policy Forum on Mental Health and Work: Bridging Employment and Health Policies, The Hague, Netherlands, 4 March 2015

  • 4-March-2015

    English

    New approach needed to tackle mental ill-health at work, says OECD

    Health and employment services should intervene earlier, involve key stakeholders and ensure they work together in order to help people with mental-health issues find work and stay in a job, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 4-March-2015

    English

    Fit Mind, Fit Job - From Evidence to Practice in Mental Health and Work

    The costs of mental ill-health for individuals, employers and society at large are enormous. Mental illness is responsible for a very significant loss of potential labour supply, high rates of unemployment, and a high incidence of sickness absence and reduced productivity at work. Following an introductory report (Sick on the Job: Myths and Realities about Mental Health and Work) and nine country reports, this final synthesis report summarizes the findings from the participating countries and makes the case for a stronger policy response.

  • 2-March-2015

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in The Hague, on 4 March 2015

    Mr. Angel Gurría was in The Hague to attend the High-Level Policy Forum on Mental Health and Work Policy Challenges in OECD Countries, where he presented key findings of the OECD Fit Mind Fit Job report and was awarded the Grand Cross of the Order of Orange Nassau.

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