Publications & Documents


  • 14-May-2015

    English

    The Economics of Prevention

    There is a rising concern in OECD countries about the expected growth in the burden of chronic diseases. This project is primarily focused on whether efforts should be made to prevent non-communicable diseases rather than treating and managing them.

  • 12-May-2015

    English

    Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use: Country profiles

    This data visualisation provides specific country figures and policy recommendations about alcohol consumption in OECD countries. Please use the ‘+share/embed’ button to customize this tool for your country and language and to generate an embed code for your website.

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  • 12-May-2015

    English

    Launch of OECD report on Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use

    The cost to society and the economy of excessive alcohol consumption around the world is massive, especially in OECD countries. This report provides clear evidence that even expensive alcohol abuse prevention policies are cost-effective in the long run and underlines the need for urgent action by governments, said OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría, launching the report in Paris.

  • 12-May-2015

    English

    Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use - Economics and Public Health Policy

    Alcoholic beverages, and their harmful use, have been familiar fixtures in human societies since the beginning of recorded history. Worldwide, alcohol is a leading cause of ill health and premature mortality. It accounts for 1 in 17 deaths, and for a significant proportion of disabilities, especially in men. In OECD countries, alcohol consumption is about twice the world average. Its social costs are estimated in excess of 1% of GDP in high- and middle-income countries. When it is not the result of addiction, alcohol use is an individual choice, driven by social norms, with strong cultural connotations. This is reflected in unique patterns of social disparity in drinking, showing the well-to-do in some cases more prone to hazardous use of alcohol, and a polarisation of problem-drinking at the two ends of the social spectrum. Certain patterns of drinking have social impacts, which provide a strong economic rationale for governments to influence the use of alcohol through policies aimed at curbing harms, including those occurring to people other than drinkers. Some policy approaches are more effective and efficient than others, depending on their ability to trigger changes in social norms, and on how well they can target the groups that are most at risk. This book provides a detailed examination of trends and social disparities in alcohol consumption. It offers a wide-ranging assessment of the health, social and economic impacts of key policy options for tackling alcohol-related harms in three OECD countries (Canada, the Czech Republic and Germany), extracting relevant policy messages for a broader set of countries.

     

  • 12-May-2015

    English

  • 29-April-2015

    English

    Health systems are still not prepared for an ageing population

    OECD insights blog: Francesca Colombo, Head of the OECD Health Division, discusses the issues related to health systems and an ageing population.

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  • 15-April-2015

    English

    OECD Guide to Measuring ICTs in the Health Sector

    The OECD launched a project on “Benchmarking ICTs in health systems”, a multi-stakeholder initiative to improve the availability and quality of health ICT data through the development of a robust measurement framework and comparable cross-national measures. This task was accomplished in 2013 with the publication of an OECD “Guide to Measuring ICTs in the Health Sector”.

  • 19-March-2015

    English

    Dementia

    Dementia is a devastating condition for the people affected, their family and friends, and for health systems. Through its global reach and ability to bring together government and non-government perspectives, OECD is in a unique position to face up to the challenge.

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  • 13-March-2015

    English

    Better dementia care and a future cure require action today, says OECD

    The current policy approach to tackling dementia is socially and economically unsustainable, according to a new OECD report. Countries need to take action now to improve the lives of people living with dementia and their carers, prioritise public research on dementia, and improve the incentives for private investment in dementia innovation.

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  • 13-March-2015

    English

    Addressing Dementia - The OECD Response

    The large and growing human and financial cost of dementia provides an imperative for policy action. It is already the second largest cause of disability for the over-70s and it costs $645bn per year globally, and ageing populations mean that these costs will grow.

    There is no cure or effective treatment for dementia, and too often people do not get appropriate health and care services, leading to a poor quality of life. Our failure to tackle these issues provides a compelling illustration of some of today’s most pressing policy challenges. We need to rethink our research an innovation model, since progress on dementia has stalled and investment is just a fraction of what it is for other diseases of similar importance and profile. But even then a cure will be decades away, so we need better policies to improve the lives of people living with dementia now. Communities need to adjust to become more accommodating of people with dementia and families who provide informal care must be better supported. Formal care services and care institutions need to promote dignity and independence, while coordination of health and care services must be improved. But there is hope: if we can harness big data we may be able to address the gaps in our knowledge around treatment and care.
     

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