Latest Documents


  • 10-December-2015

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Systems: Colombia 2016

    Colombia’s record in extending health insurance and health services to its population is impressive. In 1990, around 1 in 6 of the population had health insurance. Now, nearly 97% do, with greatest expansion occurring amongst poorer households. Likewise, in 1993 out-of-pocket spending made up 52% of total national expenditure on health. By 2006, this had fallen to less than 15%. Although Colombia has high rates of income inequality (with a Gini coefficient of 53.5 in 2012, compared to the OECD average of 32.2), access to health care services is much more equal. In urban populations, for example, 1.8% of children aged less than two years of age are recorded as having received no routine vaccinations, compared to 1.0% of rural children.  Colombia nevertheless faces important challenges to maintain and improve the performance of its health system. This report looks at Colombia’s health care system in detail and offers recommendations on what Colombia can do to ensure accessibility, quality, efficiency and sustainability.

  • 1-December-2015

    English

    Health Working Papers

    The OECD Health Working Papers series is designed to make available to a wider readership health studies prepared for use within the OECD.

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  • 27-November-2015

    English

    OECD Health Update - Autumn 2015

    The latest OECD news on health, focusing on the releases of "Health at a Glance 2015", the "OECD Review of Health Care Quality: Australia 2015", and the report "Fiscal Sustainability of Health Systems: Bridging Health and Finance Perspectives", among many other Autumn releases, and on the G7 Health Summit addressing Antimicrobial Resistance.

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  • 15-November-2015

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Care Quality: Australia 2015 - Raising Standards

    Australia’s health system functions remarkably well, despite operating under a complex set of institutions that make coordinating patient care difficult. Complications arising from a split in federal and state government funding and responsibilities are central to these challenges. This fragmented health care system can disrupt the continuity of patient care, lead to a duplication of services and leave gaps in care provision. Supervision of these health services by different levels of government can manifest in avoidable impediments such as the poor transfer of health information, and pose difficulties for patients navigating the health system. Adding to the Australian system’s complexity is a mix of services delivered through both the public and private sectors. To ease health system fragmentation and promote more integrated services, Australia should adopt a national approach to quality and performance through an enhanced federal government role in steering policy, funding and priority setting. The states, in turn, should take on a strengthened role as health service providers, with responsibility for primary care devolved to the states to better align it with hospital services and community care. A more strategic role for the centre should also leave room for the strategic development of health services at the regional level, encouraging innovation that is responsive to local population need, particularly in rural and remote areas.

  • 12-November-2015

    English

    OECD Health Statistics 2015

    OECD Health Statistics 2015 is the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries.

  • 12-November-2015

    English, Excel, 3,894kb

    OECD Health Statistics 2015: Frequently Requested Data (Excel file)

    Download this selection of key indicators from OECD Health Statistics 2015, in Excel. Final 2015 version, updated 12 November 2015.

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  • 5-November-2015

    English

    Health Inequalities

    Despite remarkable progress in health status and life expectancy in OECD countries over the past decades, there remain large inequalities not only across countries, but also across population groups within each country. These inequalities in health status are linked to many factors, including differences in exposure to risk factors to health and in access to health care.

  • 5-November-2015

    English

    Long-Term Care

    The OECD Health Division examines challenges affecting LTC systems and services, focusing particularly on the elderly population. This page will provide you with all information on ongoing and past work on LTC - that is, care for people needing support in many facets of living over a prolonged period of time.

  • 5-November-2015

    English

    Waiting Times

    Over the past decade, many OECD countries have introduced new policies to tackle excessive waiting times for elective treatments with some success. However, in the wake of the recent economic downturn and severe pressures on public budgets, waiting times may rise again, and it is important to understand which policies work.

  • 4-November-2015

    English

    Health at a Glance 2015 - OECD Indicators

    This new edition of Health at a Glance presents the most recent comparable data on the performance of health systems in OECD countries. Where possible, it also reports data for partner countries (Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russian Federation and South Africa). Compared with the previous edition, this new edition includes a new set of dashboards of health indicators to summarise in a clear and user-friendly way the relative strengths and weaknesses of OECD countries on different key indicators of health and health system performance, and also a special focus on the pharmaceutical sector. This edition also contains new indicators on health workforce migration and on the quality of health care.

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