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  • 17-October-2011

    English

    Health: Switzerland’s health system is high-performing but must prepare for the future

    The Swiss health system is one of the world’s best but must adapt to deal with rising costs and higher rates of cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, according to a new OECD/WHO report.

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  • 10-October-2011

    English

    A System of Health Accounts - 2011 Edition

    A System of Health Accounts 2011 provides a systematic description of the financial flows related to the consumption of health care goods and services. As demands for information increase and more countries implement and institutionalise health accounts according to the system, the data produced are expected to be more comparable, more detailed and more policy relevant.

    This new edition builds on the original OECD Manual, published in 2000, and the Guide to Producing National Health Accounts to create a single global framework for producing health expenditure accounts that can help track resource flows from sources to uses. The Manual is the result of a four-year collaborative effort between the OECD, WHO and the European Commission, and sets out in more detail the boundaries, the definitions and the concepts – responding to health care systems around the globe – from the simplest to the more complicated.

  • 30-June-2011

    English

    Health: spending continues to outpace economic growth in most OECD countries

    Health spending continues to rise faster than economic growth in most OECD countries, maintaining a trend observed since the 1970s. Health spending reached 9.5% of GDP on average in 2009, the most recent year for which figures are available, up from 8.8% in 2008, according to OECD Health Data 2011.

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  • 18-May-2011

    English, Excel, 708kb

    Help Wanted? Providing and Paying for Long-Term Care: Policy Brief

    Demographic ageing and social changes will make it harder to care for older people who cannot cope without help. Based on a recently published OECD report, this policy brief calls for a comprehensive approach to long-term care.

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  • 28-February-2011

    English

    Budget treatment

    The growing burden of healthcare expenditure on public budgets is hardly a recent phenomenon. For 15 years before the onset of the financial crisis, health spending per capita had been going up by over 4% per year in real terms across the OECD area-much faster than growth in real incomes. Nearly all OECD countries will soon have nearuniversal healthcare coverage-an historic achievement. But health now accounts for over 9% of GDP on

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  • 25-November-2010

    English

    Mental Health and Work

    Mental illness is a growing problem in society and is increasingly affecting productivity and well-being in the workplace. This project challenges some of the myths around mental health.

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    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 25-November-2010

    English

    Sick on the Job (2011)

    Mental illness is a growing problem in society and is increasingly affecting productivity and well-being in the workplace. This project challenges some of the myths around mental health.

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    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 24-November-2010

    English

    Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers - A Synthesis of Findings across OECD Countries

    Too many workers leave the labour market permanently due to health problems or disability, and too few people with reduced work capacity manage to remain in employment. This is a social and economic tragedy common to virtually all OECD countries. It also raises an apparent paradox that needs explaining: Why is it that the average health status is improving, yet large numbers of people of working age are leaving the workforce to rely on long-term sickness and disability benefits?  

    This report, the last in the OECD series Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers, synthesises the project’s findings and explores the possible factors behind the paradox described above. It highlights the roles of institutions and policies and concludes that higher expectations and better incentives for the main actors – workers, employers, doctors, public agencies and service providers – are crucial. Based on a review of good and bad practices across OECD countries, this report suggests a series of major reforms are needed to promote employment of people with health problems. 

    The report examines a number of critical policy choices between: tightening inflows and raising outflows from disability benefit, and promoting job retention and new hiring of people with health problems. It questions the need for distinguishing unemployment and disability as two distinct contingencies, emphasises the need for a better evidence base, and underlines the challenges for policy implementation.  

  • 7-October-2010

    English

    OECD Health Policy Studies - Value for Money in Health Spending

    This publication examines current efforts to improve health care efficiency, including tools that show promise in helping health systems provide the best care for their money.

  • 7-October-2010

    English

    Improving Value in Health Care - Measuring Quality

    Are breast cancer survival rates higher in the United States than in the United Kingdom and France? Are a patient's chances of dying within 30 days after admission to a hospital with a heart attack lower in Canada than in Korea? Are surgeons in some countries more likely to leave “foreign bodies” behind after operations or make accidental punctures or lacerations rates when performing surgery? The need for answers to these kinds of questions and the value of measuring the quality of health care are among the issues addressed in this publication. 

    Many health policies depend on our ability to measure the quality of care accurately. Governments want to increase “patient-centeredness”, improve co-ordination of care, and pay providers of high-quality care more than those who underperform. However, measuring the quality of health care is challenging. The OECD’s Health Care Quality Indicator project has overcome some of the problems, though many remain. If policy makers are serious about improving the body of evidence on the quality of care, they need to improve their health information systems.  This publication describes what  international comparable quality measures  are currently available and how  to link these measures to quality policies such as accreditation, practice  guidelines, pay-for-performance, national safety programmes and quality reporting.

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