Publications & Documents


  • 30-November-2015

    English, PDF, 370kb

    Groundwater use Denmark

    Policies to Manage Agricultural Groundwater Use - country profile Denmark

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  • 30-November-2015

    English, PDF, 388kb

    Groundwater use Mexico

    Policies to Manage Agricultural Groundwater Use - country profile Mexico

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  • 30-November-2015

    English, PDF, 2,310kb

    The FASTER Principles for Successful Carbon Pricing: An approach based on initial experience

    This report outlines principles for successful carbon pricing, based on economic principles and experience of what is already working around the world. It is intended to provide a foundation for designing efficient, and cost-effective carbon pricing instruments—primarily explicit carbon taxes and emissions trading systems—at the national and sub-national level.

  • 27-November-2015

    English

    Do environmental policies matter for productivity growth?

    This study presents new evidence on the role of environmental policies – stringency, as well as design and implementation features - for productivity growth.

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  • 25-November-2015

    English

    What is green growth and how can it help deliver sustainable development?

    In the run up to Rio+20, governments must seize new opportunities to ensure that green growth - strong economies and a clean environment - offer the potential to increase the well-being of all citizens in all countries.

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  • 25-November-2015

    English

    OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: The Netherlands 2015

    This report is the third OECD review of environmental performance in the Netherlands. It evaluates progress towards sustainable development and green growth, with a focus on sustainable mobility, and waste and materials management.


    The OECD Environmental Performance Review Programme provides independent assessments of country progress in achieving domestic and international environmental policy commitments. The reviews are conducted to improve environmental performance, promote peer learning and enhance accountability. They are supported by a broad range of economic and environmental data, and provide policy-relevant recommendations.

    Each review cycle covers all OECD countries and selected partner economies. The most recent reviews include: Spain (2015), Poland (2015), Sweden (2014).

  • 24-November-2015

    English

    Household Consumption (EPIC)

    A ground-breaking OECD survey offers insights to policy-makers on the factors that influence household behaviour towards the environment. It provides answers to the key question: How can the impact of policies encouraging greener behaviour be heightened? It also provides a deeper understanding of behavioural responses to measures and how these may differ across households and regions.

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  • 20-November-2015

    English

    "Ecological Footprint" leaving a trail at OECD

    This project is unique in that it explores how national-level policies impact household behaviour. Topics include energy use, food consumption, personal transport choices, waste generation and recycling, and water consumption. Yet the project does not specifically discuss the term “ecological footprint,” and it retains a macro-policy focus, targeting governments interested in learning which policies to implement.

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  • 17-November-2015

    English

    COP21: Climate change in figures

    Average global temperature could rise by 3-6 degrees Celsius by 2100 if we don’t act. To keep the rise to 2 degrees Celsius, we need to have net zero emissions by the end of the century. Emissions would need to peak by 2030 to give us a fighting chance of achieving this.

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  • 16-November-2015

    English

    Managing agricultural groundwater use

    Groundwater has provided great benefits to agriculture irrigation in semi-arid OECD countries, but its intensive use beyond recharge in certain regions has depleted resources and generated significant negative environmental externalities.

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