Publications & Documents


  • 4-June-2012

    English

    Greening jobs and skills

    A successful transition towards a greener economy will create new opportunities for workers, but also new risks. The challenge for labour market and skill policies is to maximise the benefits for workers and help assure a fair sharing of adjustment costs, while also supporting broader green growth policies (e.g. by minimising skill bottlenecks).

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  • 4-June-2012

    English

    OECD Insights Blog: The arithmetick of green growth

    When OECD governments asked the Organisation to develop tools to support policy analysis and monitor the progress of green growth strategies, it was clear that by its very nature green growth is not easily captured by a single indicator, and a set of measures would be needed as markers on a path to greening growth and seizing new economic opportunities. The first in a series of articles on the OECD’s contribution to the RIO+20 UN

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  • 3-June-2012

    English

    The Jobs Potential of a Shift towards a low-carbon Economy

    The Jobs Potential of a Shift towards a low-carbon Economy” provides an in-depth analysis of how green growth will reshape labour markets. It also describes the role that labour market and skill policies can play in maximising the benefits of economic greening for workers

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  • 1-June-2012

    English

    Actinide and Fission Product Partitioning and Transmutation - Eleventh Information Exchange Meeting, San Francisco, California, USA, 1-4 November 2010

    In order to provide experts with a forum to present and discuss developments in the field of partitioning and transmutation (P&T), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has been organising, since 1990, a series of biennial information exchange meetings on actinide and fission product P&T. These proceedings contain all the technical papers presented at the 11th Information Exchange Meeting, which was held on 1-4 November 2010 in San Francisco, California, USA. The meeting covered national programmes on P&T; fuel cycle strategies and transition scenarios; waste forms and geological disposal; transmutation fuels and targets; pyro and aqueous processes; transmutation physics and materials; and transmutation system design, performance and safety.

     

     

  • 31-May-2012

    English

    OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Germany 2012

    This OECD Environmental Performance Review provides an independent assessment of Germany’s progress in achieving domestic and international environmental policy commitments, together with policy relevant recommendations. It has been conducted to promote peer learning, to enhance countries’ accountability to each other and to the public, and to improve governments’ environmental performance, individually and collectively. These Reviews are supported by a broad range of economic and environmental data. Each cycle of the Environmental Performance Reviews covers all OECD member countries and selected partner countries
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  • 30-May-2012

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: United Kingdom 2012

    The United Kingdom is preparing for a deep decarbonisation of its energy system. The country has decided to halve its greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 to 2027 and to cut them by a total of 80% by 2050. For this to happen, significant private-sector investment in new energy infrastructure is needed. As it seeks concrete solutions to the low-carbon investment challenge, the United Kingdom is leading by example. The UK’s proposed Electricity Market Reform is a pioneering effort that will be closely observed by other countries. Ideally, this complex and ambitious reform would in the long run lead to a more liberalised marketplace in which low-carbon power generation technologies compete to deliver innovative and least-cost outcomes. Security of supply remains a key focus of energy policy. Fossil fuel production in the United Kingdom has peaked, and a fifth of the country’s ageing power generating capacity will have to be closed this decade. However, oil and gas imports are well diversified, and the government intends to promote various technologies to generate low-carbon electricity – renewable and nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage. More efficient energy use is essential to both decarbonisation and energy security. The Green Deal programme, which the UK plans to launch later this year, aims to improve energy efficiency in buildings and public spaces. The programme has the potential to help energy consumers overcome economic challenges, but for it to succeed, the general public must be sufficiently aware of its benefits.

  • 24-May-2012

    English, , 325kb

    Eco-innovation policies in South Africa

    This report is part of the OECD work programme on eco-innovation policies. The objective of this work is to complement the knowledge base on eco-innovation policies in OECD countries and to provide empirical material for additional research on policy issues related to eco-innovation.

  • 22-May-2012

    English

    G20 Green Growth Seminar

    The costs and consequences of inaction would be colossal, in economic, environmental and human terms. The truth is that changing our model of growth and making it greener and more inclusive is the only credible strategy that we have.

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  • 21-May-2012

    English

    Green growth in action: Mexico

    Mexico has taken action on a number of fronts to implement green growth policies, including integrating climate change mitigation and adaptation plans into their National Development Plan, and implementing energy price schemes that reflect the opportunity costs of consumption. Mexico is also developing its green growth indicators, using the OECD set of green growth indicators proposed in “Towards Green Growth: Monitoring Progress

  • 17-May-2012

    English, , 992kb

    Sustainable development, green growth and quality employment

    Background paper for the Meeting of G20 Labour and Employment MinistersGuadalajara, 17–18 May 2012, prepared by the ILO and the OECD.

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