Publications & Documents


  • 19-March-2012

    English

    Farmer Behaviour, Agricultural Management and Climate Change

    Farmer behaviour, including cultural and social factors such as education and traditional local practices, should be considered when seeking to improve the environmental and economic effectiveness of agricultural policies, says this report.

  • 13-March-2012

    English

    "Water: Meeting the Reform Challenge"

    The publication "Water: Meeting the Reform Challenge" is a call for action and a guide to getting the basics of water policy right. Sustainable financing, solid governance, and policy coherence: those are the key pillars, the building blocks for successful water reform.

  • 13-March-2012

    English

    Green growth in action: Czech Republic

    The concept of sustainable economy is becoming increasingly important for the Czech Republic.

  • 12-March-2012

    English

    “The Green Growth Challenge: No Nature, No Water, No Growth”

    Water is one of the world’s most precious resources. And today, cities, farmers, industries, energy suppliers, and ecosystems are increasingly competing for their daily water needs. As a result, the costs of inadequate water management are becoming higher and higher. And not just financially – but also in terms of lost opportunities, compromised health and environmental damage.

  • 12-March-2012

    English

    Water Quality and Agriculture: Meeting the Policy Challenge

    Improving water quality is a challenge for agricultural policy makers. This book looks at recent trends and prospects for water pollution from agriculture and the implication of climate change, and includes case studies and recommendations.

  • 8-March-2012

    English

    Meeting the Water Reform Challenge

    The need to reform water policies is as urgent as ever. Water is essential for economic growth, human health, and the environment. Yet governments around the world face significant challenges in managing their water resources effectively. The problems are multiple and complex: billions of people are still without access to safe water and adequate sanitation; competition for water is increasing among the different uses and users; and major investment is required to maintain and improve water infrastructure in OECD and non-OECD countries.   Despite progress on many fronts, governments around the world are still confronted with the need to reform their existing water policies in order to meet current objectives and future challenges. Building on the water challenges identified by the OECD Environment Outlook to 2050, this report examines three fundamental areas that need to be addressed whatever reform agendas are pursued by governments: financing of the water sector; the governance and institutional arrangements that are in place; and coherence between water policies and policies in place in other sectors of the economy. The report provides governments with practical advice and policy tools to pursue urgent reform in their water sectors.
  • 8-March-2012

    English

    Governance: Innovative Urban Financing can help cities to grow green and generate jobs

    Cities are ready to lead efforts to green the economy, concluded participants of the OECD Roundtable of Mayors and Ministers meeting in Chicago on March 8th, 2012.

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  • 7-March-2012

    English

    Video: Water - Balancing Demand

    By 2050, the world's growing population will use 55% more water in their homes, to grow food, and to produce electricity and manufactured goods. To ensure enough water to meet this demand, we will need to stop wasting it and find new ways to make sure there's enough to go around.

    Related Documents
  • 2-March-2012

    English

    International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations

    Cost estimation for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities can vary considerably in format, content and practice both within and across countries. These differences may have legitimate reasons but make the process of reviewing estimates complicated and the estimates themselves difficult to defend.  Hence, the joint initiative of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission (EC) was undertaken to propose a standard itemisation of decommissioning costs either directly for the production of cost estimates or for mapping estimates onto a standard, common structure for purposes of comparison. This report updates the earlier itemisation published in 1999 and takes into account experience accumulated thus far. The revised cost itemisation structure has sought to ensure that all costs within the planned scope of a decommissioning project may be reflected. The report also provides general guidance on developing a decommissioning cost estimate, including detailed advice on using the structure.

     

  • 29-February-2012

    English, , 177kb

    Structural reform in a crisis environment

    Note prepared for the G20 Finance and Central Bank Deputies Meeting taking place in Mexico City, Mexico February 24-25, 2012.

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