Publications & Documents


  • 12-February-2013

    English, PDF, 521kb

    Policy Brief: Greening Household Behaviour - Environmental Policy and Individual Change (EPIC) surveys

    These surveys represent a breakthrough by providing a common framework to collect empirical evidence which can be used in order to design more effective and efficient policies while taking into account social aspects. Five areas where households exert particular environmental pressures are examined: residential energy and water use, transport choices, food consumption, and waste generation and recycling.

    Related Documents
  • 11-February-2013

    English

    Blog post: Fossil fuel subsidies - billions up in smoke?

    A new OECD report presents around 550 measures that support fossil-fuel production or use in the OECD’s 34 member countries and also highlights the successes and challenges in bringing about reform, says this OECD Insights blog post.

    Related Documents
  • 6-February-2013

    English

    OECD Review of Fisheries: Country Statistics 2012

    This publication contains statistics on fisheries and aquaculture in OECD countries from 2003 to 2010. Information is provided on government financial transfers, total allowable catches, landings, employment, fleet capacity and aquaculture production.

    Related Documents
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 6-February-2013

    English

    Building Resilience for Adaptation to Climate Change in the Agriculture Sector: Proceedings of a Joint FAO/OECD Workshop

    To help meet the challenges posed by climate change, the agriculture sector should increase its resilience. This book presents the summary and papers from a joint workshop by FAO and OECD that looked at how agriculture can build resilience for adaptation to climate change.

    Related Documents
  • 5-February-2013

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Sweden 2013

    Sweden has made progress in recent years towards a more secure, sustainable energy future. The Scandinavian nation already has an almost carbon-free electricity supply and has phased out oil use in residential and power sectors. It is increasingly integrated within the Nordic and Baltic electricity markets, and its joint renewable electricity certificate market with Norway offers a unique model for other countries.

    Now Sweden must take concrete steps to realise its vision of a fossil-fuel-independent vehicle fleet by 2030 and no net greenhouse-gas emissions by 2050. Although Sweden has decided to allow the replacement of its existing nuclear reactors, further emission reductions will come at a higher cost and require technology change. This means Sweden will need to carefully evaluate the most cost-effective pathways for its transition to a low-carbon economy.

    Sweden has a high energy-intensity level, which requires greater energy efficiency in industry, buildings, heat and transport.  A decarbonisation vision should be mapped out for each industry sector. Starting with transport, Sweden must specify how it will wean its vehicle fleet from fossil fuels by 2030.

    Sweden’s industry lead in smart grids is an asset. Sweden should scale up investment in clean energy technologies. As all Nordic countries decarbonise, cost-effective regional solutions can control consumers’ costs. The large-scale deployment of renewable and energy technologies in a common Northern European energy market can drive decarbonisation without comprising competitiveness, security of supply and affordability.

    This review analyses the energy-policy challenges currently facing Sweden, and provides studies and recommendations for each sector.

  • 4-February-2013

    English

    Korea’s National Green Growth Committee Meeting

    Putting “Green” at the core of a country’s “Growth” strategy is intelligent public policy at its best! Korea understands that there is no trade-off between green and growth. Much to the contrary: there are strong synergies that can be exploited between pro-growth and pro-green policies.

  • 31-January-2013

    English

    Electricity in a Climate-Constrained World - Data and Analyses

    Electricity use is growing worldwide, providing a range of energy services: lighting, heating and cooling, specific industrial uses, entertainment, information technologies, and mobility. Because its generation remains largely based on fossil fuels, electricity is also the largest and the fastest-growing source of energy-related CO2 emissions, the primary cause of human-induced climate change. Forecasts from the IEA and others show that “decarbonising” electricity and enhancing end-use efficiency can make major contributions to the fight against climate change. 

    Global and regional trends on electricity supply and demand indicate the magnitude of the decarbonisation challenge ahead. As climate concerns become an essential component of energy policy-making, the generation and use of electricity will be subject to increasingly strong policy actions by governments to reduce their associated CO2 emissions. Despite these actions, and despite very rapid growth in renewable energy generation, significant technology and policy challenges remain if this unprecedented essential transition is to be achieved.

    This book provides an authoritative resource on progress to date in this area, with statistics related to CO2 and the electricity sector across ten regions of the world. It also presents topical analyses on meeting the challenge of rapidly curbing CO2 emissions from electricity, from both a policy and technology perspective.

  • 28-January-2013

    English

    OECD calls for better alignment of energy policy, public finances and environmental goals

    Two new OECD reports provide wide-ranging evidence of how reforming subsidies and tax breaks for fossil fuels can help countries boost finances and meet green objectives.

    Related Documents
  • 28-January-2013

    English

    Taxing Energy Use: A Graphical Analysis

    This publication provides the first systematic statistics of effective energy tax rates – on a comparable basis - for each OECD country, together with ‘maps’ that illustrate graphically the wide variations in tax rates per unit of energy or per tonne of CO2 emissions.

  • 16-January-2013

    English

    Report: Measuring the potential of local green growth - An analysis of Greater Copenhagen

    This report presents, for the first time a local ‘green growth’ indicator framework. This indicator framework was developed from the OECD ‘green growth’ strategy at the national level, but modified to highlight issues of transition that are most relevant for local areas.

  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 53 | 54 | 55 | 56 | 57 | 58 | 59 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 64 | 65 | 66 | 67 | 68 | 69 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | 85 | 86 | 87 | 88 | 89 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93 | 94 | 95 | 96 | 97 | 98 | 99 | 100 | 101 | 102 | 103 | 104 | 105 | 106 | 107 | 108 | 109 | 110 | 111 | 112 | 113 | 114 | 115 | 116 | 117 | 118 | 119 | 120 > >>