Publications & Documents


  • 10-July-2012

    English

    Green growth in action: China

    In recent years, rapid industrialisation, intensified agricultural production and urbanisation in the People's Republic of China has brought greater prosperity and higher living standards to many, but it has also created high demand for energy and raw materials, increased pressure on ecosystems and affected health outcomes. China is committed to achieving a green economy.

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  • 10-July-2012

    English

    Green growth in action: Germany

    Germany, the third largest economy in the OECD, has been proactive in developing ambitious environmental policies during the last decades, both nationally and internationally. The country’s strong environmental framework makes it not only a pioneer in environmental protection and sustainable development, but also constitutes a good example on how a cleaner low-carbon economy is compatible with growth.

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  • 9-July-2012

    English

    Rebuilding Fisheries: The Way Forward

    Governments looking to boost their fish sector should consider rights-based management systems that can create incentives for stakeholders and lead to economically and environmentally sustainable fisheries, according to this report.

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  • 3-July-2012

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Switzerland 2012

    This 2012 IEA review of Swiss energy policies finds that Switzerland has taken bold decisions to gradually phase out nuclear power and to reduce by a fifth its greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 with domestic measures only. These are challenging objectives, and the country now needs to identify the most viable ways to meet them at least cost and minimum risk to energy security.

    In the absence of nuclear power, maintaining sufficient electricity capacity will require strong policies to promote energy efficiency and renewable energy. Such measures have already been outlined, but they will likely not be enough. For baseload generation, gas-fired power plants would be the simplest option. Treating their CO2 emissions the same way as in the neighbouring countries would be a strong positive incentive for investors.

    Because Switzerland’s energy-related CO2 emissions come mostly from oil use in transport and space heating, action is most needed in these areas. Commendably, the country is making polluters pay by using a CO2 tax for financing decarbonisation efforts in space heating. Stronger efforts will be needed to reduce emissions from private car use, however.

    Since the 2007 IEA energy policy review, Switzerland has made clear progress in electricity market reform. Moving to a fully open market by 2015 would be a further positive step. The system of regulated end-user prices, however, is subsidising electricity consumption at a time when low-carbon power supply is becoming more constrained and expensive. It should be reconsidered. Switzerland should also continue to take an increasingly European approach to developing its electricity infrastructure, to its own benefit and to that of its neighbours.
  • 3-July-2012

    English

    Capacity building seminar: Strategic approaches to demographic change in Russia, Eastern Europe and OECD countries (Trento, Italy)

    The seminar was targeted at national, regional and local practitioners who dealt with anticipating and managing demographic changes in Russia and Eastern European countries and wanted to interchange experiences and approaches with other experts from OECD countries.

  • 22-June-2012

    English

    OECD Review of Fisheries 2011: Policies and Summary Statistics

    This report monitors and evaluates fisheries policies in OECD member and non-member economies, including Brazil, China, India, Indonesia and South Africa.

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  • 21-June-2012

    English

    Global Dialogue on Sustainability and Inclusion

    Despite important achievements, sustainable development is still a challenge, not a reality. In moving forward, we need to ensure that our policies have a stronger focus on sustainability and inclusion, in particular in developing countries, even more than elsewhere, said OECD Secretary-General at Rio+20.

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  • 21-June-2012

    English

    Methods for Safety Assessment of Geological Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste - Outcomes of the NEA MeSA Initiative

    Safety assessment is an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on the scientific understanding and performance assessment of safety functions as well as the hazards associated with a geological disposal facility. It forms a central part of the safety case, and the results of the safety assessments provide evidence to support decision making. The goals of the NEA project on “Methods for Safety Assessment for Geological Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste” (MeSA) were to examine and document methods used in safety assessment for radioactive waste disposal facilities, to generate collective views based on the methods’ similarities and differences, and to identify future work. The project reviewed a number of approaches used by various national and international organisations. Following the comprehensive review, a generic safety case with a safety assessment flowchart was developed and is presented herein. The elaboration of the safety concept, the use of safety functions, the implication of uncertainties and the formulation of scenarios are also discussed.

  • 20-June-2012

    English

    OECD and Rio+20

    OECD’s contribution to the Rio+20 Conference focused on how to promote greener economies in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication.

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  • 18-June-2012

    English

    Workshop: Enabling green and inclusive markets - a case for public private collaboration (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

    The OECD LEED Programme is participating in a side event of the Rio+20 Corporate Sustainability Forum co-organised by DCED and the UN Global Compact in cooperation with World Resources Institute and New Ventures India.

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