Germany


  • 22-June-2015

    English

    Competitiveness Impacts of the German Electricity Tax - Environment Working Paper

    Proposals to increase environmentally related taxes are often challenged on competitiveness grounds. The concern is that value creation in certain sectors might decline domestically if a country introduces environmentally related taxes unilaterally. This paper provides evidence on the short-term competitiveness impacts of the German electricity tax introduced unilaterally in 1999.

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  • 14-May-2014

    English

    Roundtable: Climate is Everyone’s Business

    Twenty years ago climate change was viewed as just an environmental issue. Today it is squarely an economic issue. Climate change poses significant risks to our economic systems that could result in very large damages. To mitigate these risks we need to radically transform our economies and societies to stop global warming.

  • 4-November-2013

    English

    Carbon taxes and emissions trading are cheapest ways of reducing CO2, OECD says

    Carbon taxes and emission trading systems are the most cost-effective means of reducing CO2 emissions, and should be at the centre of government efforts to tackle climate change,according to a new OECD study.

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  • 4-November-2013

    English, PDF, 925kb

    Effective Carbon Prices - Country Note for Germany

    This document present a brief synthesis of the costs to society of reducing CO2eq emissions in Germany. It is based on an examination of a broad range of policy instruments used in the electricity generation, road transport, pulp and paper, cement and household energy sectors.

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  • 24-May-2013

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Germany 2013

    Since the IEA last reviewed Germany’s energy policies in 2007, the country has taken two fundamental policy decisions that will guide its energy policy in coming decades.  In September 2010, the federal government adopted the Energy Concept, a comprehensive new strategy for a long-term integrated energy pathway to 2050. Following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in March 2011, Germany decided to accelerate the phase-out of nuclear power by 2022 starting with the immediate closure of the eight oldest plants. This decision resulted in the adoption of a new suite of policy measures, determined renewable energy as the cornerstone of future energy supply, a set of policy instruments commonly known as the Energiewende.

    In order to achieve the ambitious energy transformation set out in the Energiewende, by 2030 half of all electricity supply will come from renewable energy sources; Germany must continue to develop cost-effective market-based approaches which will support the forecast growth of variable renewable generation. Furthermore, the costs and benefits need to be allocated in a fair and transparent way among all market participants, especially households.

    Renewable energy capacity must expand alongside the timely development of the transmission and distribution networks. In addition, a stable regulatory system is necessary to ensure long-term finance to network operators. Furthermore, close monitoring of Germany’s ability to meet electricity demand at peak times should continue in the medium term.

    Energy policy decisions in Germany inevitably have an impact beyond the country’s borders and must be taken within the context of a broader European energy policy framework and in close consultation with its neighbours.

    This review analyses the energy-policy challenges facing Germany and provides recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide the country towards a more secure and sustainable energy future.

  • 19-September-2012

    English

  • 10-July-2012

    English

    Green growth in action: Germany

    Germany, the third largest economy in the OECD, has been proactive in developing ambitious environmental policies during the last decades, both nationally and internationally. The country’s strong environmental framework makes it not only a pioneer in environmental protection and sustainable development, but also constitutes a good example on how a cleaner low-carbon economy is compatible with growth.

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  • 3-May-2012

    English

    Launch of the Transport Outlook 2012

    We must improve mobility policies, foster energy technology and innovation and we must go seamless to improve efficiency and connectivity of transport. It is time to act now, to design, promote and put in place better transport policies for better lives!

  • 20-June-2011

    English

    OECD Workshop on Evaluation of Agri-Environmental Policies, Braunschweig, Germany, 20-22 June 2011

    This workshop will help policy makers improve understanding of the environmental effectiveness and economic efficiency of agricultural policies, and evaluate measures that improve agriculture’s environmental performance, such as incentives for farmers to deliver public goods.

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  • 24-May-2011

    English

    International Transport Forum on Transport and Society

    This event will bring together Ministers from over 50 countries and key players from business, research and civil society to focus on the essential role of transport within society and how it can continue to contribute to economic growth and community prosperity, Leipzig, Germany.

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