About the toolbox

 

What is the Toolbox?


Why the need for a Toolbox?


Who should use the Toolbox?


How to navigate the Toolbox?


How can you contribute to the Toolbox? 

                     

 

What is the Toolbox?

   

 

The Toolbox is an on-line resource that captures emerging good practice to enhance corruption prevention and good management in public procurement in OECD and non-OECD countries. The tools contained in this website have been compiled from practices which have already been successfully tested in a number of countries.


The tools collected respond to the needs expressed by governments to professionalise the public procurement function in public administration. They also support governments as they transform procurement from a transactional role to a strategic role, including the introduction of economic, social and environmental criteria in procurement decision making processes.


In the context of the current crisis, where billions of dollars are being channelled through public procurement to reinvigorate the economy, the tools enhance vigilance over how tax payers’ money is spent.

 

Why the need for a Toolbox?

   

 

This Toolbox supports governments to implement the 2008 OECD Principles for Enhancing Integrity in Public Procurement.  These Principles apply to the entire procurement cycle: from needs assessment, to contract award and final payment. They emphasise transparency, good management, prevention of misconduct and accountability.

 

Who should use the Toolbox?

   

 

The toolbox is intended to be of equal value for policy makers and procurement practitioners at both national and sub-national levels of government.

Governments might use the toolbox to assist:

  • conduct in-depth assessments of public procurement systems;
  • develop good management practices and enhancing integrity in public procurement; and
  • create training programmes and syllabi for public procurement practitioners.

Through the discussion of procurement tools, policy makers and procurement practitioners, in both OECD member and non-member countries, can share practical ways to professionalise and enhance integrity in public procurement.

Civil society and businesses can also use the toolbox to inform themselves about good practices to safeguard integrity in public procurement.

 

How to navigate the Toolbox?

   

 

The tools are classified according to their use in the procurement cycle, but also according to the OECD pillars underlying the OECD Recommendation.


The description of each tool is succinct and generic. Each brief includes a snapshot of the tool, its purpose and a general description of how each tool may be applied. This enables Toolbox users to consider whether individual tools are beneficial for their needs and how it may be adopted to their political, legal and institutional context without being prescriptive about its application. At times, however, references to a particular country example are provided for clarification. Further resources have been included where available to direct readers to concrete country examples, surveys and papers of the application of generic tools.

The 'tool snapshot' highlights the link of each tool to the procurement cycle and the four integrity pillars. The first panel of the snapshot provides a link to the three main phases of the procurement cycle (see figure above). The second panel provides a link to the four pillars of the OECD Principles for Enhancing Integrity in Public Procurement.

 

Tool Snapshot

 

How can you contribute to the Toolbox?

   

 

The  Toolbox will be updated regularly with new tools that have been tested – and proven to be successful- in a number of countries. Your involvement is key to keep the Toolbox relevant and responsive to your needs.

Should you have variations of these tools or altogether new tools (that have been proved to be effective) please send them to the following email address: GOV.integrity@oecd.org.

 

 

 

Related Documents

 

Procurement Toolbox