Public governance

Governing Cities

 

OECD, UN HABITAT III & THE NEW URBAN AGENDA


Good metropolitan governance stretches beyond administrative borders. Urban areas are socio-economic and environmental entities that go beyond historically defined administrative borders.  As we move towards the New Urban Agenda, Governance structures need to reflect the requirements for the future rather than historically defined administrative borders. 

This page highlights some of the main issues, challenges and opportunities governments face when deciding city & urban policy.



IN FIGURES

  • Over 50% of world’s population lives in cities.

  • Within 10 years there will be close to 500 cities of more than 1 million people.

  • Increased number of "megacities" with populations exceeding 20 million - from 2 megacities in 1950 to 41 by 2030. 

  • By 2050, 70% of the world's population - and 86% in OECD countries - will live in urban areas.

  • By 2050, 80% of older people in developed countries will live in urban areas.

  • Cities consume between 60 to 80% of energy production worldwide.

 

THE CHALLENGES

  • The continuing growth of urban populations calls for a policy response that optimises land resources.

  • Urban policies need to be tailored to the demographic changes in the population.

  • Cities are major contributors to carbon dioxide. 

  • The economic crisis has reduced governments' abilities to invest in new infrastructure.

  • Smart road policies are needed to make best use of scarce space.

  • Cities need effective resilience policies to be able to respond to disasters.

  • Large cities often have higher levels of inequality.


OPPORTUNITIES

  • Design urban policies that complement global climate policies and reduce overall cost of emission reduction.

  • Build future cities with planning and infrastructure learning from past mistakes.

  • Opportunity for developing countries to closing the gap with developed economies.

  • Links can be fostered between urban and rural areas to boost a region’s economic potential.

  • Shifting demographic scale can be an opportunity for growth and social inclusion policies.


HOW TO PREVENT CITIES FROM BECOMING INEQUALITY TRAPS?

   

TOGETHER TOWARDS THE NEW URBAN AGENDA  

 

 MAKING CITIES WORK FOR ALL

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Comparable data on economic growth, inequalities and well-being at the city level in OECD countries.

GOVERNING THE CITY

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Analyses of metropolitan governance arrangements in OECD countries and guidance for effective co-ordination.  

THE METROPOLITAN CENTURY

‌‌‌‌   An outline of recent and likely future urbanisation trends and likely consequences.  

CITIES, CLIMATE CHANGE & GREEN GROWTH

Cities are responsible for many of today’s environmental challenges. However, they are also driving many environmental policy solutions. In co-ordination with national, regional and local governments, the OECD has been working to bridge the divide between the achievement of ambitious environmental goals and economic development.

 

 

PORT CITIES

Ports play an essential role in facilitating trade flows in a global economy. Port development is closely linked to urban development. The OECD Port-cities programme assesses how global port-cities can make the most out of their port for the regional economy.

 

AGEING IN CITIES

Urban development policies can help make cities more sustainable and liveable for all generations.