Latest Documents


  • 18-July-2016

    English

    Strategic HRM and compensation

    Strategic HR Management looks at the processes and tools used to ensure that the capacities of the government workforce are aligned to the mission and core strategic objectives of the government.The OECD looks at HRM holistically, including the processes in place to bring people into the civil service, develop their skills and knowledge, and allocate their talents to priorities.

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  • 18-July-2016

    English

    Diversity and inclusion

    Workforce diversity can be a strong contributor to innovation, organisational performance and trust in public institutions. If not managed, diversity can result in lower levels of social integration, worse communication and conflict which can deteriorate performance.

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  • 18-July-2016

    English

    Skills and capacity

    The skills sets of civil servants need to keep up with the fast pace of change in the societies they aim to support and improve. The OECD is exploring the skills through which civil servants create public value for today's societies.

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  • 18-July-2016

    English

    Leadership

    Leaders are increasingly called upon not only to be effective target managers, but also to be inspiring, transformative leaders capable of driving innovation while maintaining the highest standards of accountability, integrity and transparency. The OECD is mapping the changing expectations on senior civil servants, and assessing what kind of skills and competencies are needed to meet these expectations.

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  • 18-July-2016

    English

    Public Employment and Management Working Party

    The Public Employment and Management (PEM) Working Party serves as a collaborative forum and platform for policy-makers and experts from public sector entities entrusted with civil service management responsibilities.

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  • 18-July-2016

    English

    Searching for Real Regulatory Independence - RegBlog

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, and the 2008 financial meltdown—whose aftershocks are still reverberating globally—have at least one trait in common: they reflected breakdowns in the regulatory process. This is not to say that the principal industry actors in both catastrophes were mere bystanders, but with better regulatory oversight, the disasters could have been prevented.

  • 6-July-2016

    English

    Mexico’s future will be decidedly ‘Open’ - Insights blog

    Blog post on how Mexico's commitment to open data is helping to bring a broad range of innovative services to citizens.

  • 6-July-2016

    English

    Northern Ireland (United Kingdom): Implementing Joined-up Governance for a Common Purpose

    Northern Ireland is currently undertaking public administration reforms organised around three main objectives: improving strategic approaches, improving operational delivery of services to citizens and businesses, and improving engagement with people. This review supports those reforms by providing an assessment and recommendations on a wide range of issues, including strategy-setting and co-ordination, strategic government-wide human resources management, open government, regulatory reform and digital government. It highlights areas where Northern Ireland possesses strengths upon which to build future reforms and suggests actions for the future. This is the first Public Governance Review to be conducted by the OECD at the subnational level.

  • 29-June-2016

    English

    Savings in administrative burdens in Colima and Jalisco

    This report measures the administrative costs generated by formalities in the municipalities of Colima and Jalisco.

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  • 22-June-2016

    English

    Open Government Data Review of Mexico - Data Reuse for Public Sector Impact and Innovation

    Mexico has developed an ambitious national open data policy to create value from the use and re-use of government data by the public, private and social sectors. Open government data (OGD) has the potential to spur the digital economy, as well as contribute to more efficient public service delivery and greater public engagement. Mexico has demonstrated its commitment to OGD through its close involvement in international open data initiatives. However, it faces challenges in effectively implementing OGD domestically in a way that makes a greater impact on the economy and society. This would require, notably, institutionalizing open data, understanding the demand for government data, reaching out to potential users and working more closely with local governments. To fully realise the potential of open data, it is crucial that public bodies understand the benefits, are fully behind the project and actively participate in its implementation. This report provides an analysis of Mexico’s policies as well as recommendations for achieving its national objectives and making the most of OGD.

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