Reports


  • 4-October-2017

    English, PDF, 354kb

    The Pursuit of Gender Equality - Key findings for Germany

    Selected findings for Germany from the report "The Pursuit of Gender Equality: An Uphill Battle"

  • 21-August-2017

    English

  • 13-June-2017

    English, PDF, 266kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2017 - Key findings for Germany

    By the end of 2016, employment in Germany had risen to 66% of the population aged 15-74, markedly higher than the OECD average of 61%. It is projected to continue to rise to 68% by the end of 2018, 9 percentage points above its pre-crisis level in 2007, driven importantly by an increase in part-time work.

  • 13-May-2017

    English

    A Fiscal Approach for Inclusive Growth in G7 Countries

    The report was produced in response to a request of the Italian Presidency of the G7, and has fed into discussions held at the G7 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors, 13 May 2017, Bari, Italy.

    Related Documents
  • 13-April-2017

    English

    Towards a Better Globalisation - How Germany Can Respond to the Crisis

    People in many countries, especially advanced countries, are expressing growing discontent about globalisation. They feel that its benefits have accrued mostly to a small and already well-off segment of the population. In addition, many citizens are dissatisfied with the way economic integration has been advanced. They complain about too little transparency and too many conflicts of interests between policy makers and firms. Several of the negative effects feeding the discontent have more to do with technological change than with globalisation per se, but the two are closely intertwined. Moreover, the policies put in place to alleviate negative impacts of economic openness on some groups, industries and regions have not always worked as intended, and global rule-making has not kept up with reality. Given its many benefits, reversing economic integration is not a solution. Rather, we need to find ways to make it work for all. This report sets out what needs to be done to advance a fairer and more inclusive globalisation – at the global level, at the European level and within Germany.

  • 11-April-2017

    English, PDF, 2,843kb

    Towards a Better Globalisation: How Germany can respond to the critics

    Citizens in many countries are expressing dissatisfaction with how they believe trade, technology and immigration are affecting their daily lives. While much of this discontent can be traced back to the global economic crisis, its root causes are more complex. What can be done at the Global, European and German level?

    Related Documents
  • 11-April-2017

    English

    Taxing Wages: Germany

    The tax burden on labour income is expressed by the tax wedge, which is a measure of the net tax burden on labour income borne by the employee and the employer.

    Related Documents
  • 6-April-2017

    English, PDF, 418kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Germany

    Germany had the 2nd highest tax wedge among the 35 OECD member countries in 2016. The country had the 3rd highest position in 2015. The average single worker in Germany faced a tax wedge of 49.4% in 2016 compared with the OECD average of 36.0%.

  • 28-March-2017

    English

    Tax and Skills: Key findings for all countries

    These country specific notes provide figures and commentary from the Taxation and Skills publication that examines how tax policy can encourage skills development in OECD countries.

    Related Documents
  • 20-February-2017

    English

    Dare to Share: Germany's Experience Promoting Equal Partnership in Families

    This review introduces the background to and issues at stake in promoting equal partnerships in families in Germany.  It encourages German policy makers to build on the important reforms since the mid-2000s to enable both fathers and mothers to have careers and children, and urges families to “dare to share”. To those ends it places Germany’s experience in an international comparison, and draws from the experience in, for example, France and the Nordic countries which have longstanding policies to support work-life balance and strengthen gender equality. The review starts with an overview chapter also explaining why and how equal sharing pays for families, children, the economy and society as a whole. The book presents current outcomes, policy trends, as well as detailed analysis of the drivers of paid and unpaid work and how more equal partnerships in families may help sustain fertility rates.  The book examines policies to promote partnership, looking both at persistent shortcomings and progress achieved through reform since the mid-2000s. The book includes a set of policy recommendations designed to enable parents to share work and family responsibilities more equally.

  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 > >>