Reports


  • 4-July-2018

    English, PDF, 238kb

    OECD Employment Outlook 2018 - Key findings for Germany

    The German employment rate has been developing very favourably despite the global financial crisis. In the last quarter of 2017, 66.6% of 15-74 year-olds were in work – the highest rate since the reunification and over 6 percentage points above the rate in early 2008.

    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 4-July-2018

    German, PDF, 250kb

    Deutschland im Vergleich: OECD Beschäftigungsausblick 2018

    Die Beschäftigungsquote in Deutschland hat sich trotz der globalen Finanzkrise sehr positiv entwickelt. Im letzten Quartal 2017 waren 66,6% aller 15-74-Jährigen erwerbstätig. Dies ist die höchste Quote seit der Wiedervereinigung und über 6 Prozentpunkte mehr als Anfang 2008.

    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 21-June-2018

    English

    Germany - OECD Anti-Bribery Convention

    This page contains all information relating to implementation of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention in Germany.

    Related Documents
  • 15-June-2018

    English, PDF, 1,069kb

    A broken social elevator? Key findings for Germany

    A broken social elevator? Key findings for Germany

    Related Documents
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 15-June-2018

    German, PDF, 1,107kb

    Ist der Soziale Aufzug ka-putt? DEUTSCHLAND im Vergleich

    Ist der Soziale Aufzug ka-putt? DEUTSCHLAND im Vergleich

    Related Documents
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 12-June-2018

    English

    Economic Survey of Germany 2018

    Germany has been enjoying strong economic performance in recent years, building on strengthened domestic demand, good social outcomes and export performance. Exports have benefited from a large, productive and innovative manufacturing sector which has reinforced its position in sectors of long-standing comparative advantage, notably cars, chemical products and machine tools.

    Related Documents
  • 27-April-2018

    English

    Germany: Towards Stronger, Fairer and Greener Growth

    Overall, the German economy is performing very well. Still, many citizens feel they do not sufficiently benefit from Germany’s good economic performance, as evidenced by the outcomes of the recent election. They perceive that their well-being is compromised by technological change, foreign competition and the arrival of migrants. Germany’s new government will have to tackle these issues by making growth not only stronger, but also fairer and greener. This report identifies key policy reforms to help the country achieve this goal, to foster productivity gains, boost public investment and ensuring that everybody can benefit from Germany’s strong economy and that no one is left behind. The German government needs the right labour, education and tax policies to foster access to quality jobs for everyone, including women, youth, the elderly and immigrants, while meeting the country’s climate objectives. The OECD is proud of its long-standing policy dialogue with Germany and looks forward to supporting the new government. Together, let us design, promote and implement better policies for better lives in Germany and worldwide.
  • 26-April-2018

    English, PDF, 505kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Germany

    Germany had the 2nd highest tax wedge among the 35 OECD member countries in 2017. The country occupied the same position in 2016. The average single worker in Germany faced a tax wedge of 49.7% in 2017 compared with the OECD average of 35.9%.

  • 19-December-2017

    English

    Government at a Glance

    Government at a Glance provides a dashboard of key indicators to help you analyse international comparisons of public sector performance.

  • 15-December-2017

    English

    Making Dispute Resolution More Effective – MAP Peer Review Report, Germany (Stage 1) - Inclusive Framework on BEPS: Action 14

    Under Action 14, jurisdictions have committed to implement a minimum standard to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the mutual agreement procedure (MAP). The MAP is included in Article 25 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and commits countries to endeavour to resolve disputes related to the interpretation and application of tax treaties. The Action 14 Minimum Standard has been translated into specific terms of reference and a methodology for the peer review and monitoring process.The peer review process is conducted in two stages.  Stage 1 assesses jurisdictions against the terms of reference of the minimum standard according to an agreed schedule of review. Stage 2 focuses on monitoring the follow-up of any recommendations resulting from jurisdictions' stage 1 peer review report. This report reflects the outcome of the stage 1 peer review of the implementation of the Action 14 Minimum Standard by Germany.
  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 > >>