Gender data highlights

 

New OECD data and analysis revealing the wide gap in pension benefits between men and women

 

 ©Photosensitive/ReutersProgress for women and girls in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

September 2015 - The UN Sustainable Development Goals could be a real game changer for gender issues, with wins in fraught areas such as reproductive rights. But there will be challenges, and opposing voices, to contend with in the years ahead. 

© OECD Observer

   


Güler Turan Senator, Member of the Flemish Parliament, Member of the Committee on Economic Affairs, Employment, Social Economics, Innovation and Science ©Rights reservedWhy quotas work for gender equality‌

June 2015 - Gender inequality is one of the most primitive and oldest forms of inequality. Sadly, it is still very much a reality in most parts of the world. In many countries women do not have equal access to education, healthcare, safety, work or political decision-making. 

© OECD Observer

  


Mari Kiviniemi, OECD Deputy Secretary-General

Why a push for gender equality makes sound economic sense

June 2015 - This year’s OECD Forum coincides with the celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Beijing Declaration, which was an important milestone to promote gender equality worldwide. Much has been achieved since 1995, but unfortunately, a lot remains to be done to close the gender gap and increase women’s participation in our economies and societies.

  © OECD Observer  


Hee-Jung Kim Minister of Gender Equality and Family, Republic of Korea, ©Korean government

Korea's work-life balance policies for sustainable growth

June 2015 - Of the abundant resources given to mankind, what is the most underused resource of our time? Without a doubt, women!

The potential of women must be fully tapped if we are to secure a path to sustainable development and address the ever-decreasing working-age population in the post-2015 era.

© OECD Observer

  


      

More women on board

June 2015 - The 30% Club is a group of company chairmen, chairwomen and CEOs committed to achieving better gender balance at all levels of their organisations through voluntary actions.

Business leadership is key: this takes the issue beyond a specialist diversity effort and into mainstream talent management. This is a collaborative approach to creating change.

© OECD Observer  


©Wikimedia/Andrea BooherWomen are catching up to men in volunteering, and they engage in more altruistic voluntary activities

March 2015 - Over the last six years women have increased their participation in volunteering and are today almost on par with men. The biggest increase in female participation in voluntary activities was registered in Italy, the Slovak Republic, Canada and Estonia. In many countries a gender dimension is more apparent in specific sectors and voluntary roles rather than in overall participation rates in volunteering. Men are much more likely than women to volunteer in sports associations, while women make up the majority of volunteers active in the social and health sector.

  


©Photos LibresGender gaps in secondary education and early marriage

March 2015 - Closing gender gaps in education by improving female education require addressing discriminatory social norms such as early marriage. Education is essential for women’s and girl’s empowerment, but social norms, such as early marriage, force girls to abandon their education limiting educational opportunities. This is extremely important for developing countries where increased female education can be a catalyst for change leading to better health and employment outcomes and increase women’s decision-making power.

   


©Freedigitalphotos.netAid to fragile states and economies targeting gender equality

March 2015 - In October 2015, it will be 15 years since the adoption of the landmark United Nations Security Council resolution 1325 on women, peace and security. While greater political attention at the international level has contributed to an increased focus on gender equality in donor support to fragile states, only a small proportion of aid to fragile states addresses women’s needs and priorities. 

  



©Freedigitalphotos.netWhat do women do online?

March 2015 - For most people, the Internet is now part of everyday life. On average, about 80% of adults and 95% of 16-24-years-olds in the OECD use the Internet, most of them on a daily basis. And so do women, with the gender gap in Internet use closing up in a majority of OECD countries. In 2005, only 55% of women and 61% men were Internet users while these ratios have now reached 80% and 82% respectively.

 

  


©Freedigitalphotos.netFinancial literacy

March 2015 - Are the gender differences found in mathematics or reading performance also observed in financial literacy performance? The 2012 PISA financial literacy assessment revealed that there are no gender differences in financial literacy scores among 15-year-old students in most countries and economies participating in the exercise. Only in Italy do boys perform better than girls, but differences are small.

 

    


OECD data and analysis revealing the wide gap in pension benefits between men and women

The data show that across European OECD countries and the United States, pension payments to individuals aged 65 and over were 28% lower, on average, for women than for men. Differences are above 40% in Germany, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, while in Estonia the pension gap is small. And having often spent more caring for children or relatives over their lifetimes, older women often do not meet contributory requirements and are therefore more likely to receive minimum pension payments or old-age safety nets.

 Download graph and data in Excel


Pay gap

March 2015 - Unequal pay between men and women continues to pose problems, despite decades of legislation by governments to address it, like the Equal Pay Act in the United States and the French labour code on wage equality introduced about half a century ago. In fact, not only are women still paid considerably less than men throughout the world, but UN predictions suggest the gap will persist for 70 years to come. 

© OECD Observer

 


© AFP/Kobal/The Picture DeskForging a gender-balanced economy

June 2014 - “I am only a woman!” declares Sybylla Melvyn with deliberate irony, in the Australian classic novel, My Brilliant Career. When Miles Franklin wrote the novel in 1901, aged just 19, she was embarking on her own career path, and though successful, like Sybylla, she encountered many social, economic and cultural hurdles along the way.

© OECD Observer  

   


Balancing paid work, unpaid work and leisure 

March 2014 - Greater gender equality in working hours is not just about more women in full-time employment. It is also about more men reducing their long hours in paid work. Although detailed information is available for a limited number of OECD countries, data on the usual hours worked per week illustrate how the prevalence of long and short working hours differs across countries and the sexes.

 


Not a math person?

March 2014 - Boys continue to outperform girls in mathematics by the equivalent of around three months of school, that is an average of 11 score points in the PISA assessment. Across OECD countries 15% of boys but only 11% of girls achieve at the highest levels of proficiency in mathematics. By contrast, girls outperform boys in reading in all countries by an average of 38 score points (across OECD countries) - the equivalent of one year of school. 

 


 Women in government

March 2014 - In many OECD countries, women’s representation is much higher in public sector than in private sector employment. In 2010, women accounted for less than 45% of workers in the total labour force but for 57% of public sector employees in OECD countries.

 


 Financing the unfinished business of gender equality beyond 2015

March 2014 - The third Millennium Development Goal (MDG 3) – to promote gender equality and empower women – has been a catalyst in galvanising new resources for gender equality and women’s rights. Bi-lateral donors’ aid in support of gender equality has tripled since the MDGs from USD 8 billion in 2002 to USD 24 billion in 2012. Most of this aid went to education and health.

 


©David Rooney‌ Closing the gender gap can boost the economy 

March 2014 - Reconciling work and family commitments is a challenge in every country, but particularly for Japanese men and women. Much more so than in most other OECD countries, men and women have to choose between babies and bosses: men choose bosses, women less so, but on the whole there are very few babies and there is too little female employment. These shortcomings are increasingly coming to the fore and will have to be addressed. 

© OECD Observer

 


Who wants to be an entrepreneur?

March 2013 - Fewer women than men become entrepreneurs. In 2012, only 18% of women in the OECD (and 32% of men) have ever started or are taking steps to establish a business (See the chart below). There are even fewer women among business owners with paid employees.

 


Crisis cuts gender jobs gap but everyone loses

March 2013 - The economic crisis has affected men and women differently in the job market. On average in the OECD, female employment rates have held up at 57%, while male employment rates fell from 75.7% in the first quarter of 2007 to 73% in the third quarter of 2012, the gender employment gap got smaller, but not in the way we would have liked.

 


Where are tomorrow’s female scientists?

March 2013 - In reading, 15-year-old girls outperform 15-year-old boys (by the equivalent of roughly one year of school), while in mathematics  boys outperform girls (though by a narrower margin, the equivalent of less than half a year of school); in science there is instead little difference between boys’ and girls’ performance. Yet dig a little deeper and a more nuanced picture emerges.

 

  


 Do women patent?

March 2012 - Women’s contribution to technological progress is substantial and increasing in all countries. But are countries taking full advantage of women's innovative ideas? Do women with good ideas manage to turn them into marketable products?

  

  


 Chairman or Chairwoman

March 2012 - Greater gender diversity in companies’ boardrooms can lead to better management. However, we are still far from a consensus on the best way to improve women’s representation on boards.

  


Women and Informality

March 2012 - Informal employment is widespread throughout the developing world where it concerns over half to three-quarters of non-agricultural employment. A recent data collection carried out by ILO and Women in Informal Employment Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO) provides evidence that women are more likely than men to work in the informal economy.

 

 

    

 

 

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