Reports


  • 15-April-2014

    English

    Taxing Wages: Country note for Sweden

    The average worker in Sweden faced a tax burden on labour income (tax wedge) of 42.9% in 2013 compared with the OECD average of 35.9%. Sweden was ranked 8 of the 34 OECD member countries in this respect.

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  • 18-March-2014

    English, PDF, 364kb

    Society at a Glance 2014 - Key findings for Sweden

    This note presents key findings for Sweden from Society at a Glance 2014 - OECD Social indicators. This 2014 publication also provides a special chapter on: the crisis and its aftermath: a “stress test” for societies and for social policies.

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  • 12-December-2013

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Care Quality: Sweden 2013

    This report reviews the quality of health care in Sweden. It begins by providing an overview of the range of policies and practices aimed at supporting quality of care in Sweden (Chapter 1). It then focuses on three key areas particularly relevant to elderly populations: strengthening primary care in Sweden (Chapter 2), better assurance for quality in long-term care (Chapter 3), and improving care after hip fracture and stroke (Chapter 4). In examining these areas, this report highlights best practices and provides recommendations to improve the quality of care in Sweden.

  • 26-November-2013

    English, PDF, 340kb

    Pensions at a Glance 2013 - Highlights for Sweden

    Old age poverty is generally low, but people aged 76 and above have a higher then OECD average poverty rate. However, publicly provided services matter the most in Sweden and play a major role in enhancing the income of all households, especially the elderly.Recent reforms to occupational pension plans in Sweden will lead to a better level of income... protection in retirement for high income earners compared to average income earners.

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  • 2-octobre-2013

    Français

    Suède - CAD Examens par les pairs de la coopération pour le développement, 2013

    L’an dernier, les apports d’aide publique au développement (APD) de la Suède se sont élevés à 5.24 milliards USD, soit 0.99 % de son revenu national brut (RNB).

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  • 26-avril-2013

    Français

    Statistiques de l'OCDE sur la dette de l'administration centrale 2012

    Les gouvernements sont parmi les principaux émetteurs de titres d’emprunt sur le marché mondial des capitaux. Le présent volume fournit des informations quantitatives sur les titres d’emprunt d’État pour les 34 pays membres de l'OCDE en vue de répondre aux besoins analytiques des utilisateurs tels que les pouvoirs publics, les spécialistes de la gestion de la dette et les analystes de marché. Les statistiques sont présentées selon un plan d’ensemble normalisé pour permettre une comparaison entre les différents pays. Les notes méthodologiques par pays donnent des informations sur les émissions de titres d’emprunt dans chacun des pays, ainsi que sur le cadre institutionnel et réglementaire dans lequel s’inscrivent la politique de gestion de la dette et les techniques de vente.
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  • 5-March-2013

    English

    Mental Health and Work: Sweden

    Tackling mental ill-health of the working-age population is becoming a key issue for labour market and social policies in OECD countries. OECD governments increasingly recognise that policy has a major role to play in keeping people with mental ill-health in employment or bringing those outside of the labour market back to it, and in preventing mental illness. This report on Sweden is the second in a series of reports looking at how the broader education, health, social and labour market policy challenges identified in Sick on the Job? Myths and Realities about Mental Health and Work (OECD, 2012) are being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It concludes that Swedish policy makers recognise the need to take steps to tackle mental ill-health and its labour market implications, but that a more comprehensive reform effort and a long-term commitment to it is needed in order to prevent problems from arising in the first place and respond more effectively when they do occur.
  • 5-February-2013

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Sweden 2013

    Sweden has made progress in recent years towards a more secure, sustainable energy future. The Scandinavian nation already has an almost carbon-free electricity supply and has phased out oil use in residential and power sectors. It is increasingly integrated within the Nordic and Baltic electricity markets, and its joint renewable electricity certificate market with Norway offers a unique model for other countries.

    Now Sweden must take concrete steps to realise its vision of a fossil-fuel-independent vehicle fleet by 2030 and no net greenhouse-gas emissions by 2050. Although Sweden has decided to allow the replacement of its existing nuclear reactors, further emission reductions will come at a higher cost and require technology change. This means Sweden will need to carefully evaluate the most cost-effective pathways for its transition to a low-carbon economy.

    Sweden has a high energy-intensity level, which requires greater energy efficiency in industry, buildings, heat and transport.  A decarbonisation vision should be mapped out for each industry sector. Starting with transport, Sweden must specify how it will wean its vehicle fleet from fossil fuels by 2030.

    Sweden’s industry lead in smart grids is an asset. Sweden should scale up investment in clean energy technologies. As all Nordic countries decarbonise, cost-effective regional solutions can control consumers’ costs. The large-scale deployment of renewable and energy technologies in a common Northern European energy market can drive decarbonisation without comprising competitiveness, security of supply and affordability.

    This review analyses the energy-policy challenges currently facing Sweden, and provides studies and recommendations for each sector.

  • 5-February-2013

    English

    OECD Reviews of Innovation Policy: Sweden 2012

    This OECD Review of Innovation Policy for Sweden offers a comprehensive assessment of Sweden's  innovation system, focusing on the role of government. It provides concrete recommendations on how to improve policies that affect innovation performance, including R&D policies, and identifies good practices from which other countries can learn.
  • 17-December-2012

    English, PDF, 353kb

    Closing the Gender Gap - country note: Sweden

    Gains in female education attainment have contributed to a worldwide increase in women’s participation in the labour force, but considerable gaps remain in working hours, conditions of employment and earnings.  More specific data for Sweden are available in this country note.

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