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Publications & Documents


  • 28-November-2018

    English

    Financing Climate Futures - Rethinking Infrastructure

    Infrastructure worldwide has suffered from chronic under-investment for decades and currently makes up more than 60% of greenhouse gas emissions. A deep transformation of existing infrastructure systems is needed for both climate and development, one that includes systemic conceptual and behavioural changes in the ways in which we manage and govern our societies and economies. This report is a joint effort by the OECD, UN Environment and the World Bank Group, supported by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety. It focuses on how governments can move beyond the current incremental approach to climate action and more effectively align financial flows with climate and development priorities. The report explores six key transformative areas that will be critical to align financial flows with low-emission and resilient societies (planning, innovation, public budgeting, financial systems, development finance, and cities) and looks at how rapid socio-economic and technological developments, such as digitalisation, can open new pathways to low-emission, resilient futures.
  • 27-November-2018

    English

    Seminar on social insurance coverage in SMEs held in Viet Nam

    The European Union Social Protection Systems Programme (EU-SPS) presented its new report on extending social insurance coverage among Viet Nam’s small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) on 26 November.

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  • 27-November-2018

    English

    Latin American Regional Policy Dialogue on Women’s Economic Empowerment

    Latin American Regional Policy Dialogue on Women’s Economic Empowerment will take place on 27-28 of January in Montevideo, Uruguay.

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  • 27-November-2018

    English

    For Good Measure - Advancing Research on Well-being Metrics Beyond GDP

    The 2009 Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress ('Stiglitz-Sen-Fitoussi' Commission) concluded that we should move away from over-reliance on GDP when assessing a country’s health, towards a broader dashboard of indicators that would reflect concerns such as the distribution of well-being and sustainability in all of its dimensions. This book includes contributions from members of the OECD-hosted High Level Expert Group on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress, the successor of the Stiglitz-Sen-Fitoussi Commission, and their co-authors on the latest research in this field. These contributions look at key issues raised by the 2009 Commission that deserved more attention, such as how to better include the environment and sustainability in our measurement system, and how to improve the measurement of different types of inequalities, of economic insecurity, of subjective well-being and of trust.A companion volume Beyond GDP: Measuring What Counts for Economic and Social Performance presents an overview by the co-chairs of the High Level Expert Group, Joseph E. Stiglitz, Jean-Paul Fitoussi and Martine Durand of the progress accomplished since the 2009 report, of the work conducted by the Group over the past five years, and of what still needs to be done.
  • 27-novembre-2018

    Français

    La riposte à la crise aurait été plus vigoureuse si l’on avait disposé de meilleurs indicateurs

    De meilleures données sur l’économie et le bien-être de la population auraient amené les pouvoirs publics à adopter une action plus musclée pour lutter contre les conséquences de la crise financière de 2008 et l’érosion constante de la confiance dans les institutions, d’après les conclusions d’un nouveau rapport.

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  • 27-November-2018

    English

    Beyond GDP - Measuring What Counts for Economic and Social Performance

    Metrics matter for policy and policy matters for well-being. In this report, the co-chairs of the OECD-hosted High Level Expert Group on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress, Joseph E. Stiglitz, Jean-Paul Fitoussi and Martine Durand, show how over-reliance on GDP as the yardstick of economic performance misled policy makers who did not see the 2008 crisis coming. When the crisis did hit, concentrating on the wrong indicators meant that governments made inadequate policy choices, with severe and long-lasting consequences for many people. While GDP is the most well-known, and most powerful economic indicator, it can’t tell us everything we need to know about the health of countries and societies. In fact, it can’t even tell us everything we need to know about economic performance. We need to develop dashboards of indicators that reveal who is benefitting from growth, whether that growth is environmentally sustainable, how people feel about their lives, what factors contribute to an individual’s or a country’s success. This book looks at progress made over the past 10 years in collecting well-being data, and in using them to inform policies. An accompanying volume, For Good Measure: Advancing Research on Well-being Metrics Beyond GDP, presents the latest findings from leading economists and statisticians on selected issues within the broader agenda on defining and measuring well-being.
  • 26-November-2018

    English

    The Future of Well-being

    Korea has consistently positioned itself at the leading edge of societal and technological change. Nowhere is that more visible than here in Incheon, an ultra-modern, forward-looking city by the sea.

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  • 19-novembre-2018

    Français

    Dans quelle mesure les politiques économiques contribuent-elles au travail indépendant ?

    En utilisant des régressions des données de panels temps-pays au cours des deux dernières décennies, ce document cherche à identifier les principaux facteurs politiques et institutionnels qui expliquent la part du travail indépendant dans les pays européens.

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  • 12-novembre-2018

    Français

  • 7-November-2018

    English

    The Future of Social Protection - What Works for Non-standard Workers?

    Social protection systems are often still designed for the archetypical full-time dependent employee. Work patterns deviating from this model – be it self-employment or online 'gig work' – can lead to gaps in social protection coverage. Globalisation and digitalisation are likely to exacerbate this discrepancy as new technologies make it easier and cheaper to offer and find work online, and online work platforms have experienced spectacular growth in recent years. While new technologies and the new forms of work they create bring the incomplete social protection of non-standard workers to the forefront of the international policy debate, non-standard work and policies to address such workers’ situation are not new: across the OECD on average, one in six workers is self-employed, and a further one in eight employees is on a temporary contract. Thus, there are lessons to be learned from country experiences of providing social protection to non-standard workers. This report presents seven policy examples from OECD countries, including the 'artists’ insurance system' in Germany or voluntary unemployment insurance for self-employed workers in Sweden. It draws on these studies to suggest policy options for providing social protection for non-standard workers, and for increasing the income security of on-call workers and those on flexible hours contracts.
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