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  • 1-August-2019

    English

    Investing in Youth: Korea

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and key emerging economies. The report on Korea presents new results from a comprehensive analysis of the situation of young people in Korea, exploiting various sources of survey-based and administrative data. It provides a detailed assessment of education, employment and social policies in Korea from an international perspective, and offers tailored recommendations to help improve the school-to-work transition. Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017), Norway (2018), and Finland and Peru (2019).
  • 21-May-2019

    English

    Tackling Vulnerability in the Informal Economy

    A majority of workers in the world are informally employed and contribute to economic and social development through market and non-market activities that are not protected, regulated, well-recognised or valued. This study provides an in-depth diagnosis of informality and the vulnerability prevailing in the informal economy. It explores new ideas to improve the lives of workers in the informal economy based on the ILO indicators of informality and the new OECD Key Indicators of Informality based on Individuals and their Household (KIIbIH).The report contributes in four ways to the global debate on the transition from the informal to the formal economy: 1) by examining the multiple faces of informality in a large sample of countries representing diverse conditions, locations and stages of development; 2) by presenting new empirical evidence on the links between informality and the development process; 3) by assessing risks and vulnerabilities in the informal economy, such as poverty and occupational risks, which can be mitigated with social protection and appropriate risk management instruments; 4) by showing that the transition to formality is a complex issue that touches on a wide range of policy domains.
  • 15-May-2019

    English

    Measuring Distance to the SDG Targets 2019 - An Assessment of Where OECD Countries Stand

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set a broad and ambitious programme for the world to achieve by 2030. With 17 Goals, underpinned by 169 Targets, the complex and integrated nature of the 2030 Agenda presents national governments with huge challenges for implementation. To assist countries, the OECD has developed a unique methodology allowing comparison of progress across SDG goals and targets. Based on the UN Global List of 244 indicators, this study evaluates the distance that OECD countries need to travel to meet SDG targets for which data is currently available. This 2019 edition of the study presents the latest results for OECD countries, both on average and individually, as well as new exploratory approaches to assessing progress over time and transboundary aspects of the SDGs. By providing a high-level overview of countries’ strengths and weaknesses in performance across the SDGs, this study aims to support member countries in navigating the SDGs and in setting their own priorities for action within the broad 2030 Agenda.
  • 6-May-2019

    English

    Legal Needs Surveys and Access to Justice

    This report offers an empirical tool to help planners, statisticians, policy makers and advocates understand people's everyday legal problems and experience with the justice system. It sets out a framework for the conceptualisation, implementation and analysis of legal needs surveys and is informed by analysis of a wide range of national surveys conducted over the last 25 years. It provides guidance and recommendations in a modular way, allowing application into different types of surveys. It also outlines opportunities for legal needs-based indicators that strengthen our understanding of access to civil justice.
  • 30-avril-2019

    Français

    L’ascenseur social en panne ? Comment promouvoir la mobilité sociale

    Ce rapport propose des données inédites sur la mobilité sociale, alors que les inégalités de revenu et des chances se creusent dans les pays de l'OCDE et dans certaines économies émergentes. Il couvre les aspects ayant trait à la fois à la mobilité sociale entre les parents et leurs enfants et à la mobilité individuelle sur l’échelle des revenus tout au long de la vie, ainsi que leurs déterminants. Le rapport montre que la mobilité sociale d’une génération à l’autre est limitée au regard des différentes dimensions que sont les revenus, l’éducation, l’emploi et la santé, le constat étant identique s’agissant de la mobilité individuelle sur l’échelle des revenus au cours de l’existence. On observe notamment une absence de mobilité au bas et au sommet de l’échelle sociale – avec des phénomènes de « planchers adhérents » limitant les possibilités d’ascension sociale et de « plafonds adhérents » associés à une monopolisation des opportunités au sommet de l’échelle. L’absence de mobilité sociale a des répercussions aussi bien économiques que politiques, sans compter les effets qu’elle engendre à l’échelle de la société. Le rapport montre que les pouvoirs publics peuvent agir pour améliorer la mobilité dans nos sociétés et pour protéger les ménages des effets négatifs provoqués par les chocs enregistrés au niveau des revenus. Il examine les options et les mesures à la disposition des responsables de l’action publique afin d’améliorer la mobilité sociale entre les générations et au sein de ces dernières.
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  • 24-April-2019

    English

    Can Social Protection Be an Engine for Inclusive Growth?

    The potential role of social protection in the development process has received heightened recognition in recent years, yet making a strong investment case for social protection remains particularly challenging in many emerging and developing countries. This report challenges us to think deeply about the economic rationale for social protection investments through an inclusive development lens. It helps us understand the links between social protection, growth and inequality; how to measure those links empirically; social protection’s impact on inclusive growth; and how to build a more solid economic case for greater social protection investments.The report adds to the debate on social protection in three ways. First, it proposes a methodological framework to conceptualise and measure the impact of social protection on what the OECD defines as inclusive growth. Second, it provides new empirical evidence on the impact of different social protection programmes on inclusive growth. Third, it helps strengthen the case for greater investments in social protection while also calling for better data to measure impacts.
  • 17-April-2019

    English

    Peru should help more young vulnerable people into work

    Peru’s remarkable economic growth since the 2000s and policies targeting the most vulnerable young people have helped boost the youth employment rate. Peru should now focus on improving job opportunities for low-skilled youth, young women and indigenous and Afro-Peruvian youth, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 17-April-2019

    English

    Investing in Youth: Peru

    The present report on Peru is part of the series on 'Investing in Youth', which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the areas of social, employment, education and training policies. Its main focus is on young people who are not in employment, education or training (the 'NEETs').Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017), and Norway (2018).
  • 16-April-2019

    English, PDF, 125kb

    Agenda High Level Dialogue with Africa May 2019

    The OECD Development Centre and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Government of Japan present a High-Level Dialogue with Africa. To be held on 21 May 2019, at the OECD headquarters in Paris, the special event is to reflect on one of the key themes of the African Union Agenda 2063: promoting economic transformation in Africa.

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  • 15-April-2019

    English

    Liberal Democratic Party of Japan: Seminar on “Empowering Women”

    As championed by Prime Minister Abe, the role of women in public life is crucial for a prosperous economy and sustainable inclusive growth. Better gender balance among politicians promotes inclusive policymaking and boosts trust in government. To increase women’s representation in politics, it is vital that parties themselves are inclusive and promote female candidates during elections.

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