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  • 18-May-2019

    English

    Informality and Poverty in Zambia - Findings from the 2015 Living Standards and Monitoring Survey

    As Zambia plans for extending social protection coverage, this high level of informality will be an important challenge for the social protection system, in particular in terms of coordinating both non-contributory social assistance mechanisms and contributory social insurance programmes. This report on informality and poverty presents useful and critical information to support comprehensive policy dialogue on suitable interventions for extension of coverage by providing in-depth analyses of the socioeconomic characteristics of informal workers and analyzing the relationship between household welfare and formal/informal employment status of household members. For the first time this study provides a detailed distributional analysis of welfare and wellbeing levels of informal workers in Zambia.
  • 15-May-2019

    English

    SIGI 2019 Regional Report for Eurasia

    Over the past decade, the Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI) has consistently shown that governments need to look at discriminatory laws, social norms and practices to achieve gender equality and promote women’s empowerment. This 2019 regional report provides an overview of the main outcomes of the SIGI in 12 Eurasian countries in relation to women and the family, their physical integrity, access to productive and financial resources and their civic rights, as well as the economic cost they represent. Building on these outcomes, the report provides a set of tailored regional policy recommendations to enhance Eurasia's governmental efforts to deliver their gender-equality commitments through a three-pronged approach: legal reforms and transformative gender policies, laws through community mobilisation and empowerment, and policy efficiency through accountability and monitoring.
  • 7-May-2019

    English

    Finland should do more to improve job prospects of low-skilled youth

    Finland must make every effort to streamline the benefit system and encourage young jobseekers to look for work in order to reduce the share of under-30 year-olds who are not in employment, education or training (NEETs), according to a new OECD report.

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  • 7-May-2019

    English

    Investing in Youth: Finland

    The series Investing in Youth builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. It covers both OECD countries and key emerging economies. The report on Finland presents new results from a comprehensive analysis of the situation of young people in Finland, exploiting various sources of survey-based and administrative data. It provides a detailed assessment of education, employment and social policies in Finland from an international perspective, and offers tailored recommendations to help improve the school-to-work transition. Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017), Norway (2018) and Peru (2019).
  • 4-mai-2019

    Français

    L’ascenseur social en panne ? Comment promouvoir la mobilité sociale

    Ce rapport propose des données inédites sur la mobilité sociale, alors que les inégalités de revenu et des chances se creusent dans les pays de l'OCDE et dans certaines économies émergentes. Il couvre les aspects ayant trait à la fois à la mobilité sociale entre les parents et leurs enfants et à la mobilité individuelle sur l’échelle des revenus tout au long de la vie, ainsi que leurs déterminants. Le rapport montre que la mobilité sociale d’une génération à l’autre est limitée au regard des différentes dimensions que sont les revenus, l’éducation, l’emploi et la santé, le constat étant identique s’agissant de la mobilité individuelle sur l’échelle des revenus au cours de l’existence. On observe notamment une absence de mobilité au bas et au sommet de l’échelle sociale – avec des phénomènes de « planchers adhérents » limitant les possibilités d’ascension sociale et de « plafonds adhérents » associés à une monopolisation des opportunités au sommet de l’échelle. L’absence de mobilité sociale a des répercussions aussi bien économiques que politiques, sans compter les effets qu’elle engendre à l’échelle de la société. Le rapport montre que les pouvoirs publics peuvent agir pour améliorer la mobilité dans nos sociétés et pour protéger les ménages des effets négatifs provoqués par les chocs enregistrés au niveau des revenus. Il examine les options et les mesures à la disposition des responsables de l’action publique afin d’améliorer la mobilité sociale entre les générations et au sein de ces dernières.
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  • 25-avril-2019

    Français

    Il faut agir rapidement pour que les individus puissent faire face à l'évolution du monde du travail

    Il ressort d'un nouveau rapport de l'OCDE que les gouvernements doivent repenser leur approche du travail et des emplois afin de réduire les tensions sociales et économiques. Si l'on n'agit pas rapidement, de nombreux individus, notamment les moins qualifiés, resteront en retrait d'un monde du travail en pleine mutation.

    Documents connexes
  • 24-April-2019

    English

    Can Social Protection Be an Engine for Inclusive Growth?

    The potential role of social protection in the development process has received heightened recognition in recent years, yet making a strong investment case for social protection remains particularly challenging in many emerging and developing countries. This report challenges us to think deeply about the economic rationale for social protection investments through an inclusive development lens. It helps us understand the links between social protection, growth and inequality; how to measure those links empirically; social protection’s impact on inclusive growth; and how to build a more solid economic case for greater social protection investments.The report adds to the debate on social protection in three ways. First, it proposes a methodological framework to conceptualise and measure the impact of social protection on what the OECD defines as inclusive growth. Second, it provides new empirical evidence on the impact of different social protection programmes on inclusive growth. Third, it helps strengthen the case for greater investments in social protection while also calling for better data to measure impacts.
  • 17-April-2019

    English

    Peru should help more young vulnerable people into work

    Peru’s remarkable economic growth since the 2000s and policies targeting the most vulnerable young people have helped boost the youth employment rate. Peru should now focus on improving job opportunities for low-skilled youth, young women and indigenous and Afro-Peruvian youth, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 17-April-2019

    English

    Fast Forward to Gender Equality - Mainstreaming, Implementation and Leadership

    This report maps strategies, governance tools, institutional settings and innovative approaches used by governments across the OECD to drive and support society-wide gender equality goals. It covers all state institutions, including legislatures and judiciaries, and discusses the challenges faced by OECD countries in achieving long-lasting impact. Finally, the report provides policy guidance for state institutions, supported by examples of what works across the OECD. This report establishes a baseline for monitoring progress, based on the 2015 OECD Recommendation of the Council on Gender Equality in Public Life.
  • 17-April-2019

    English

    Investing in Youth: Peru

    The present report on Peru is part of the series on 'Investing in Youth', which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the areas of social, employment, education and training policies. Its main focus is on young people who are not in employment, education or training (the 'NEETs').Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016), Japan (2017), and Norway (2018).
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