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  • 14-May-2018

    English, PDF, 259kb

    The Future of Social Protection: What works for non-standard workers?

    Rapid and deep technological changes driven by the digital revolution, together with globalisation and demographic changes, are creating many new job opportunities but also new challenges. In particular, these transformations are contributing to the rise in non-standard forms of employment – self-employment, temporary work, and ‘independent contracting’.

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  • 14-mai-2018

    Français

    Débattre des enjeux : le vieillissement

    Le vieillissement a de nombreuses répercussions sur les individus et la société dans son ensemble. Mais ses conséquences sur les soins de santé, la vie professionnelle et le bien-être en général ne sont pas toujours telles que nous l’imaginons. Le rapport de la série Les essentiels de l’OCDE : débattre des enjeux consacré au vieillissement examine les problèmes, les défis et les opportunités que représente le vieillissement pour les citoyens et les pouvoirs publics des pays développés et en développement. Des experts de l'OCDE ou d’ailleurs dans les domaines de la démographie, de la recherche médicale, des retraites, de l’emploi et autres, y présentent leurs analyses et points de vue sur l'une des tendances les plus déterminantes pour nos societés.
  • 11-May-2018

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Montreal on 13-15 May 2018

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, was in Montreal from 13 to 15 May 2018 to attend the OECD Ministerial Meeting on Social Policy where he delivered remarks on Social Policy for Shared Prosperity: Embracing the Future and the OECD Policy Forum where he delivered remarks on The Future of Social Protection.

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  • 7-May-2018

    English

    OECD Conference on wealth inequalities: measurement and policies, 26 April 2018

    This one-day conference brings together researchers, policy-makers and stakeholders from across the OECD to discuss the evidence on the nature of inequalities in the distribution of household wealth, their implications for society and the challenges for policy-makers that they raise.

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  • 30-April-2018

    English

    The OECD Risks That Matter Survey 2018

    To find out more about people’s perceptions of social and economic risks and how well they think their government reacts to those risks, the OECD recently launched a brand-new cross-national survey – the OECD Risks that Matter survey.

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  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees

    Behind every migration statistic, there are individuals or families starting a new life in a new place. Local authorities, in co-ordination with all levels of government and other local partners, play a key role in integrating these newcomers and empowering them to contribute to their new communities. Integration needs to happen where people are: in their workplaces, their neighbourhoods, the schools to which they send their children and the public spaces where they will spend their free time. This report describes what it takes to formulate a place-based approach to integration through concerted efforts across levels of government as well as between state and non-state actors. It draws on both quantitative evidence, from a statistical database, and qualitative evidence from a survey of 72 cities. These include nine large European cities (Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Berlin, Glasgow, Gothenburg, Paris, Rome and Vienna) and one small city in Germany (Altena), which are the subject of in-depth case studies. The report also presents a 12-point checklist, a tool that any city or region – in Europe, the OECD or beyond – can use to work across levels of government and with other local actors in their efforts to promote more effective integration of migrants.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees in Altena

    Altena is a small industrial town in the Land of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. The city has experienced a significant decline in its population in recent decades and further substantial decreases are predicted through 2030. In this context, the municipality has come to approach migrant integration as a chance to revive the city, counteract demographic change and fill existing labour force demands. In 2015, the city took on 100 more asylum seekers and refugees than required by federal allocation. In 2017, migrants made up 11.3% of the total population of Altena and the majority (54%) have lived there for longer than ten years. This report presents the way Altena and its state and non-state partners are addressing migrant integration issues and opportunities. In particular, the report sheds light on how refugees and asylum seekers have benefited from housing and civic participation programmes as well as the local responses to the peak in refugee and asylum seeker arrivals since 2015. In such a context, when migrant integration is part of the local development strategy, one key question is 'How to encourage migrants stay in Altena?'.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees in Amsterdam

    In Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 51.66% of the population was born outside of the country or has at least one parent born abroad. Amsterdam is proud of its cultural and ethnical diversity and actively works to attract international students and high-skilled migrants. Like many European cities, Amsterdam experienced a peak in refugees and asylum seekers arrivals in 2015 and in response has implemented a holistic integration model, which starts at the moment migrants arrive and supports them for their first three years. Migrants are not considered as a minority group with different needs, but rather as one group among others with specific characteristics (such as women, the elderly, the disabled, LGBT) whose outcomes are monitored to identify potential structural gaps in their access to opportunities and services. This work compiles data and qualitative evidence on how local actions for integration, across a number of sectors, are being designed and implemented by the City of Amsterdam and its partners within a multi-level governance framework.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees in Gothenburg

    Today, 34% of the population of Gothenburg, Sweden, was born outside of the country or has at least one parent born abroad. The city is growing at a fast pace: 4 400 new residents registered in 2016. Newcomers account for the bulk of demographic growth, of which 12 858 refugees settled in the city between 2010 and 2016. However, migration is not a new phenomenon in Gothenburg, with nearly 41.7% of migrant residents having arrived more than 10 years ago. The Gothenburg municipality has a significant track record in managing the impact of migration on local demand for work, housing, goods and services, cultural and linguistic diversity, and other parts of daily life. This report presents the way Gothenburg municipality and its state and non-state partners are addressing migrant integration issues and opportunities. It compiles data and qualitative evidence on how local integration efforts are designed and implemented within a multi-level governance framework.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Housing Dynamics in Korea - Building Inclusive and Smart Cities

    Housing in Korea has been part of the government policy development agenda for the past three decades contributing to reducing the historical housing shortage and improving the quality of dwellings. Despite its achievements, Korea now faces a housing affordability challenge as prices are too high for several social groups (i.e. newly wedded), owner occupancy levels are decreasing, and social housing is struggling to meet demand. Korea has a complex social housing system largely focused on low-income households, who still suffer from housing poverty in terms of housing stability, affordability and quality.
     
    A holistic view on housing policy to promote a more inclusive society and sustainable economic growth is needed. To overcome the current housing challenge requires expanding the network of public housing providers by including the private and community sectors that could alleviate the government’s financial burden. Korea is linking housing and urban regeneration strategies to respond to the complex challenges of social inclusion, job creation, housing and economic revitalisation. Korea has been at the forefront of smart city development for more than a decade, which has brought benefits to Korean cities such as integrated transport systems, and it is now committed to applying the concept as a vehicle for inclusive growth.
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