Latest Documents


  • 21-novembre-2013

    Français

    Panorama de la santé 2013

    Cette nouvelle édition du Panorama de la santé présente les données comparables les plus récentes sur la performance des systèmes de santé dans les pays de l’OCDE.

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  • 30-October-2013

    English

    Cancer Care - Assuring Quality to Improve Survival

    More than five million new cases of cancer are diagnosed every year in OECD countries. Mortality rates are declining, but not as fast as for other big killers such as heart disease, and cancer survival rates show almost a four-fold difference across countries. In short, many countries are not doing as well as they could in the fight against cancer.

    Cancer Care: Assuring Quality to Improve Survival surveys the policy trends in cancer care over recent  years and looks at survival rates to identify the why some countries are doing better than others. It sets out what governments should do to reduce the burden of cancer in their countries. As well as an adequate level of resourcing, a comprehensive national cancer control plan appears critical, emphasising initiatives such as early detection and fast-track treatment pathways. Countries also need better data, particularly for patients’ experiences of care, in order to provide high quality, continuously improving cancer care.

  • 30-octobre-2013

    Français

    L’amélioration du dépistage et des traitements réduirait le taux de mortalité par cancer, estime l'OCDE

    Selon un nouveau rapport de l'OCDE préparé en coopération avec la Commission européenne et fondé sur des travaux antérieurs de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé, un dépistage plus précoce et un traitement plus efficace du cancer pourraient réduire d’un tiers environ le taux de mortalité lié à cette maladie, ce qui permettrait de sauver la vie de près d’un million de personnes dans les pays développés chaque année.

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  • 22-October-2013

    English

    Managing Hospital Volumes: Germany and Experiences from OECD Countries

    To help inform the Conference on Managing Hospital Volumes, co-organised by the German Federal Ministry of Health and the OECD, and held on the 11th April 2013 in Berlin, the OECD Secretariat produced a paper to provide an international perspective on Germany’s situation and the current policy debate.

  • 12-September-2013

    English, PDF, 108kb

    The future of public health: policy decisions today for tomorrow’s populations - Speech by Yves Leterme at EPHA

    The future of public health: policy decisions today for tomorrow’s populations. Our health, our economy, our society, our future: a Brave New World. Remarks by Yves Leterme, Deputy Secretary-General, OECD. Brussels, Belgium, September 4th 2013.

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  • 11-July-2013

    English, PDF, 1,115kb

    Expenditure on Prevention Activities under SHA 2011: Supplementary Guidance

    Experience from the substantial health gains of the 20th century suggests that spending on prevention could be an important factor. Therefore, gathering data on such spending that are consistent and comparable, both over time and across countries, is potentially very useful. This paper aims to help clarify what should be included as spending on prevention under SHA 2011 to facilitate accurate comparisons.

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  • 27-juin-2013

    Français

    Les dépenses de santé continuent de stagner dans les pays de l’OCDE

    Après avoir chuté brutalement en 2010, les dépenses de santé ont continué de stagner dans l’ensemble des pays de l’OCDE en 2011, alors que la crise économique continuait de peser notamment sur les pays européens, comme le montre la Base de données de l’OCDE sur la santé 2013.

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  • 17-June-2013

    English, PDF, 647kb

    Policy Brief: A Good Life in Old Age? Monitoring and Improving Quality in Long-term Care

    While the number of elderly people in need of care is projected to at least double, governments are struggling to deliver high-quality care to people facing reduced functional and cognitive capabilities. Based on a recent OECD and EC report, this policy brief looks at data and policies to measure quality in long-term care and drive standards of care up.

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  • 17-June-2013

    English

    A Good Life in Old Age? - Monitoring and Improving Quality in Long-term Care

    As ageing societies are pushing a growing number of frail old people into needing care, delivering quality long-term care services – care that is safe, effective, and responsive to needs – has become a priority for governments. Yet much still remains to be done to enhance evidence-based measurement and improvement of quality of long-term care services across EU and OECD countries. This book offers evidence and examples of useful experiences to help policy makers, providers and experts measure and improve the quality of long-term care services.

  • 15-May-2013

    English

    Strengthening Health Information Infrastructure for Health Care Quality Governance - Good Practices, New Opportunities and Data Privacy Protection Challenges

    Health data constitutes a significant resource in most OECD countries that could be used to improve population health, the quality of health care and the performance of health systems. Rising levels of chronic diseases; concerns about the quality and safety of patient care; the need to assure value for investments in health care; and the need to allocate health resources wisely; are all too important to be left without good evidence for decision making.

    This book, based on studies of 19 countries on the development and use of personal health data and of 25 countries on development and use of electronic health record systems, includes results showing good practices, new opportunities and data privacy protection challenges. It finds that well-intended policies to allay concerns about breaches of confidentiality and potential misuse of personal health data may be limiting data use, but that the next five years appear promising, in terms of both the number of countries that plan to implement national electronic health record systems and the number that consider it likely that data from these systems will be used for some aspects of health care quality monitoring. They also appear promising for the further use of existing personal health databases and for the linkage of multiple data sources to generate new evidence.

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