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Portugal


  • 27-February-2020

    English

    Country Health Profiles 2019

    The 2019 Country Health Profiles have been released on November 28. The Country Health Profiles are the result of joint work between the OECD and the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. They provide a concise and policy-relevant overview of health and health systems in the EU/European Economic area, emphasizing the particular characteristics and challenges in each country against a backdrop of cross-country comparisons.

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  • 28-November-2019

    English

    Portugal: Country Health Profile 2019

    This profile provides a concise and policy-relevant overview of health and the health system in Portugal as part of the broader series of the State of Health in the EU country profiles. It provides a short synthesis of: the health status in the country; the determinants of health, focussing on behavioural risk factors; the organisation of the health system; and the effectiveness, accessibility and resilience of the health system. This profile is the joint work of the OECD and the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies, in co-operation with the European Commission.
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  • 20-March-2019

    English

    OECD Reviews of Pension Systems: Portugal

    This review provides policy recommendations on how to improve the Portuguese pension system, building on the OECD’s best practices in pension design. It details the Portuguese pension system and identifies its strengths and weaknesses based on cross-country comparisons. The Portuguese pension system consists of an old-age safety net, a pay-as-you-go defined benefit scheme and voluntary private savings. The safety net includes an old-age social pension and a complement (the so-called Complemento Solidário para Idosos or CSI), both of which pursue similar objectives but have different eligibility criteria. The defined benefit scheme has two main components: the general social security scheme (regime geral da Segurança Social) and the civil-servant pension scheme (Caixa Geral de Aposentações or CGA). The latter has been closed to new entrants since 2006 with new civil servants contributing to the general scheme. Funded voluntary pensions make up a very small share of total pension entitlements. The OECD Reviews of Pension Systems: Portugal is the fourth in the series, after Ireland (2014), Mexico (2016) and Latvia (2018), with a fifth review on Peru under preparation. 
  • 23-November-2017

    English

    Portugal: Country Health Profile 2017

    This report looks at the state of health in Portugal.
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  • 28-March-2017

    English, PDF, 362kb

    Overview of Health Policy in Portugal

    Despite financial strains, Portugal has shown a great level of commitment towards improving the quality and efficiency of its health system while maintaining a universal public system. However, although progress has been achieved, certain areas demand further scrutiny such as access to health care services – especially among the most vulnerable population – quality of care, healthier lifestyles and the long-term care system.

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  • 7-juillet-2015

    Français

    Statistiques de l'OCDE sur la santé 2015 - Notes par pays

    Base de données Statistiques de l'OCDE sur la santé 2015 - Notes par pays

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  • 27-May-2015

    English

    Health care quality improved in Portugal, despite tight budgets

    The Portuguese National Health Service has responded well to financial pressure, successfully balancing the twin priorities of financial consolidation and continuous quality improvement, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 27-May-2015

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Care Quality: Portugal 2015 - Raising Standards

    This report reviews the quality of health care in Portugal, seeks to highlight best practices, and provides a series of targeted assessments and recommendations for further improvements to quality of care. The Portuguese National Health Service has responded well to financial pressure, successfully balancing the twin priorities of financial consolidation and continuous quality improvement. Even in the post-crisis years when GDP fell and health spending declined, improvements in quality of care continued. The need to reduce health spending has been met through a combination of structural reforms, and a well-designed suite of quality initiatives. Reforms around the purchasing and use of pharmaceuticals and medical devices have helped drive down costs, and Portugal has been innovative in how public funds are used to pay providers, increasingly basing payments on quality and efficiency. Important priorities for further work in the Portuguese health system do remain. Portugal will need to improve clinical processes and pathways, particularly in the acute sector. There is still room to improve efficiency, for instance increasing the share of generic drug consumption, and using the Portuguese health workforce more effectively, especially through expanded roles for nurses. Further structural reform is needed with an emphasis on shifting care out of hospitals into less-expensive community settings, and Portugal will also need to reflect on the strategic direction of the primary care system which, following an impressive reform, now risks developing into a two-tiered system with increasingly divergent levels of care quality.  
  • 30-September-2013

    English

    Tackling Portugal’s Health Challenges and Promoting Well Being

    In Portugal, health spending has been reduced from 10.8% of GDP in 2009 to 10.2% now. This has been achieved by rationalising spending on pharmaceuticals, promoting the use of generic drugs, moderating salaries; cutting the fees paid to hospitals, and increasing user charges, while still protecting those in most need, said OECD Secretary-General.

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  • 7-February-2011

    English

    OECD Health Working Paper No. 55: Mortality Amenable to Health Care in 31 OECD Countries: Estimates and Methodological Issues

    The mortality amenable to health care is defined as a possible indicator to measure the health care systems performance in preventing premature deaths that can be avoided by appropriate health care intervention. This paper assesses the feasibility of using this indicator in OECD countries.

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