Australie


  • 19-July-2016

    English

    Health Policy in Your Country

    This new OECD series aims to highlight the latest data in selected countries, to explain their health care systems and to provide key information in a clear and concise way. Each country snapshot highlights the most pertinent issues, be it smoking, obesity, surgical interventions, consumption of antibiotics, physicians density, etc., with the help of key statistics and are followed by brief policy recommendations.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 311kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in Australia

    Entry to initial medical education in Australia can either occur directly following the completion of secondary school (entry to undergraduate medical education) or following the completion of a bachelor degree in any field (entry to graduate medical education). In 2014, 18 medical schools offered medical education programs in Australia.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 326kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Australia

    In Australia, there are two main categories for nurses: Enrolled Nurses (EN) (who, after an additional 6 months of studies, can become Endorsed Enrolled Nurses (EEN)) and Registered Nurses (RN). Graduates from RN programmes can pursue further education and training to become Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) or Nurse Practitioners (NP).

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  • 10-February-2016

    English, PDF, 538kb

    Overview of Health Policy in Australia

    The Australian health system is a complex mix of federal and state government funding and responsibility, making it difficult for patients to navigate. Despite its complexity, Australia’s universal health system achieves good results relatively efficiently.

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  • 7-December-2015

    English

    Mental Health and Work: Australia

    Tackling mental ill-health of the working-age population is a key issue for labour market and social policies in OECD countries. OECD governments increasingly recognise that policy has a major role to play in keeping people with mental ill-health in employment or bringing those outside of the labour market back to it, and in preventing mental illness. This report on Australia is the ninth and last in a series of reports looking at how the broader education, health, social and labour market policy challenges identified in Sick on the Job? Myths and Realities about Mental Health and Work (OECD, 2012) are being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It concludes that policy thinking in Australia shows well-advanced awareness both of the costs of mental illness for society as a whole and of the health benefits of employment. However, challenges remain in: making employment issues a concern of the health care services; helping young people succees in their future working lives; making the workplace a safe, supportive psychosocial environment; and better designing and targeting employment services for jobseekers with mental ill-health.

  • 7-December-2015

    English

    Australia should build on the mental health reform to strengthen employment outcomes of people with mental health issues

    The recent mental health reform is an important step towards better services for people with mental ill-health, but Australia needs to do more to help people with mild to moderate mental health issues at and into work, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 15-novembre-2015

    Français

    Le système de santé australien est trop complexe pour les patients

    L’Australie devrait améliorer l’intégration des services de santé tout au long du parcours de soins des patients afin de se préparer à l’augmentation des maladies chroniques et simplifier le système de santé pour les patients, selon un nouveau rapport de l’OCDE.

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  • 15-November-2015

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Care Quality: Australia 2015 - Raising Standards

    Australia’s health system functions remarkably well, despite operating under a complex set of institutions that make coordinating patient care difficult. Complications arising from a split in federal and state government funding and responsibilities are central to these challenges. This fragmented health care system can disrupt the continuity of patient care, lead to a duplication of services and leave gaps in care provision. Supervision of these health services by different levels of government can manifest in avoidable impediments such as the poor transfer of health information, and pose difficulties for patients navigating the health system. Adding to the Australian system’s complexity is a mix of services delivered through both the public and private sectors. To ease health system fragmentation and promote more integrated services, Australia should adopt a national approach to quality and performance through an enhanced federal government role in steering policy, funding and priority setting. The states, in turn, should take on a strengthened role as health service providers, with responsibility for primary care devolved to the states to better align it with hospital services and community care. A more strategic role for the centre should also leave room for the strategic development of health services at the regional level, encouraging innovation that is responsive to local population need, particularly in rural and remote areas.

  • 14-November-2014

    English, PDF, 527kb

    Value in Pharmaceutical Pricing: Australia Country Profile

    This country profile describes in details the Australian pharmaceutical system, including decision-making processes for regulatory approval, reimbursement and pricing; assessment guidelines; institution and stakeholders involved and specific policies for new high cost drugs, when available.

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  • 21-November-2013

    English, PDF, 519kb

    Australia needs to tackle its rising levels of obesity, says OECD Health at a Glance report

    Australians continue to enjoy one of the highest levels of health across the developed world but need to address Australia’s growing obesity problem, according to a new OECD report.

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