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Publications


  • 20-June-2019

    English

    Applying the OECD Principles on Water Governance to Floods - A Checklist for Action

    This report uses the OECD Principles on Water Governance as a tool for multi-stakeholder policy dialogue and practical assessment of the performance of flood governance systems. It applies the Principles to flood-prone contexts to help strengthen governance frameworks for managing the risks of 'too much' water. By 2050, 1.6 billion people will be at risk of flooding, affecting nearly 20% of the world’s population at an increasing rate and many times over with dire social, economic and environmental consequences. In this report, a checklist is proposed as a self-assessment tool for stakeholders in flood management, based on lessons learned from 27 case studies that feature practical experiences and highlight common features and key challenges in flood governance.
  • 20-June-2019

    English

    Global EV Outlook 2019 - Scaling-up the transition to electric mobility

    The Global EV Outlook is an annual publication that identifies and discusses recent developments in electric mobility across the globe. It is developed with the support of the members of the Electric Vehicles Initiative (EVI). Combining historical analysis with projections to 2030, the report examines key areas of interest such as electric vehicle and charging infrastructure deployment, ownership cost, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and battery material demand. The report includes policy recommendations that incorporate learning from frontrunner markets to inform policy makers and stakeholders that consider policy frameworks and market systems for electric vehicle adoption. This edition features a specific analysis of the performance of electric cars and competing powertrain options in terms of greenhouse gas emissions over their life cycle. As well, it discusses key challenges in the transition to electric mobility and solutions that are well suited to address them. This includes vehicle and battery cost developments; supply and value chain sustainability of battery materials; implications of electric mobility for power systems; government revenue from taxation; and the interplay between electric, shared and automated mobility options.
  • 20-June-2019

    English

    The Future of Cooling in China - Delivering on action plans for suistainable air conditioning

    The People’s Republic of China had the fastest growth in space cooling energy consumption worldwide in the last two decades, driven by increasing income and growing demand for thermal comfort. This report explores the principal trends and challenges related to this rapid growth, looking into existing market developments, policies, technology choices and occupant behaviour in buildings in China. It then looks at how cooling demand in buildings might evolve over the next decade to 2030 and considers what China can do to ensure greater cooling comfort without parallel growth in energy consumption and related emissions. The report recommends raising energy performance standards for cooling equipment, tapping into building design opportunities, and ensuring that 'part time' and 'part space' behaviour remains the principal cooling mode in buildings. These strategies, among others, will reduce the impact of rising cooling demand on China’s electricity system, unlocking benefits in terms of reduced power capacity investments, lower energy and maintenance costs, improved air quality, and greater access to cooling comfort.
  • 20-June-2019

    English

    Energy Policies Beyond IEA Countries: Morocco 2019

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) regularly conducts in-depth peer reviews of the energy policies of its association countries, a process that supports energy policy development and encourages the exchange of international best practices and experiences. This report on Morocco discusses the advancements made as well as the challenges faced by the country’s ambitious domestic energy transition pathway to 2030.With an impressive track record in solar technologies, Morocco is leading the deployment of renewable energy in North Africa. Further progress, however, can be made in commercial or industrial applications that continue to rely on fossil fuel imports. Although successful in providing electricity access to its rising population, Morocco also faces the challenging task of keeping energy demand in check. In this report, the IEA provides recommendations for how to strengthen Morocco’s energy efficiency policies to help the country continue to transform its energy sectors in order to meet the renewable energy and energy efficiency targets.
  • 20-June-2019

    English

    Securing Investments in Low-Carbon Power Generation Sources

    Japan’s G20 presidency 2019 asked the International Energy Agency to analyse progress in G20 countries towards securing investments in low-carbon power generation. The Japan presidency, which began on 1 December 2018 and runs through 30 November 2019, has placed a strong focus on innovation, business and finance.1 In the areas of energy and the environment, Japan wishes to create a 'virtuous cycle between the environment and growth', which is the core theme of the G20 Ministerial Meeting on Energy Transitions and Global Environment for Sustainable Growth in Karuizawa, Japan, 15-16 June 2019.A first draft report was presented to the 2nd meeting of the G20 Energy Transitions Working Group (ETWG), held through 18-19 April 2019. This final report incorporates feedback and comments submitted during April by the G20 membership and was shared with the ETWG members.This final report is cited in 'Proposed Documents for the Japanese Presidency of the G20' that was distributed to the G20 energy ministers, who convened in Karuizawa on 15-16 June 2019.This report, prepared as an input for the 2019 G20 ministerial meeting, is an IEA contribution; it is not submitted for formal approval by energy ministers, nor does it reflect the G20 membership’s national or collective views. This report looks at one of the key challenges for the decarbonisation of the energy sector, notably in organised power markets. Based on insights from the IEA flagship publication, World Energy Outlook 2018, and from the recent World Energy Investment 2019, the report provides guidance to policy makers on how to accelerate the decarbonisation of the power sector.
  • 20-June-2019

    English

    Status of Power System Transformation 2019 - Power system flexibility

    As power systems around the world transform, power system flexibility has become a global priority. A range of operational, policy and investment-based interventions are available to render modern systems more flexible, thereby facilitating cleaner, and more reliable, more resilient, and more affordable energy. This report identifies challenges and opportunities to unlock system flexibility and accelerate power system transformation (PST) efforts. It provides an overview of the policy, regulatory and market instruments which can be implemented in different power sector contexts to mitigate these challenges. Importantly, all power system assets, including variable renewable energy, can provide flexibility services, if enabled by proper policy, market and regulatory frameworks. These assets include power plants, electricity networks, energy storage and distributed energy resources. A wealth of known strategies, approaches and instruments can be readily applied and adapted to power systems. These include modifications to: energy strategies; legal frameworks; policies and programmes; regulatory frameworks; market rules; system operation protocols; and connection codes. Moving forward, updating system flexibility policies to match the pace of technological development can help to accelerate global PST, while ensuring that all classes of power system assets are able to receive fair remuneration for the flexibility services they are capable of providing.
  • 20-June-2019

    English

    Integrating Power Systems across Borders

    Since the earliest days of their development, power systems have run up against, and then across, jurisdictional boundaries. A primary driver of this expansion has been economics, in particular a desire to lower the overall investment and operating costs of the power systems in question. At the same time, cross-border power system integration can bring with it a number of security benefits. More recently, a third driver of cross-border system integration has become more relevant: the integration of increasing shares of variable renewable energy (VRE) sources.The main question is not whether jurisdictions should integrate their power systems across borders, but how they should. This report looks at international experience with cross border integration. It identifies for policymakers the three critical areas of collaboration for effective integration: system operations, long-term planning and the role of regional institutions. The report discusses how it is possible to integrate power systems across borders without sacrificing local autonomy, and how a balance between regional and local priorities is necessary to realise its full benefits.
  • 20-juin-2019

    Français

    Le rôle des plateformes numériques dans la collecte de la TVA/TPS sur les ventes en ligne

    Ce rapport propose des orientations pratiques pour les autorités fiscales pour la conception et la mise en œuvre des diverses solutions disponibles pour impliquer les plateformes numériques, y compris les places de marché du commerce électronique dans la collecte efficace et effective de la TVA/TPS sur le commerce numérique de biens, de services et de biens incorporels. En particulier, il inclut de nouvelles mesures pour rendre les plateformes numériques responsables de la TVA/TPS sur les ventes réalisées par les vendeurs en ligne via ces plateformes, ainsi que d’autres mesures telles que le partage d’informations et l’amélioration de la coopération administrative entre autorités fiscales et plateformes numériques. Il se base sur les solutions pour la collecte efficace de la TVA/TPS sur les ventes numériques proposées par les Principes directeurs internationaux pour la TVA/TPS et le Rapport final 2015 BEPS Action 1 - Relever les défis fiscaux posés par l’économie numérique. Il est particulièrement pertinent dans le contexte de la croissance de l’économie des plateformes et du potentiel des plateformes numériques pour améliorer de manière significative l’efficacité de la collecte de la TVA/TPS, compte tenu de leur rôle important dans la réalisation, la facilitation et/ou l’exécution des ventes en ligne.
  • 20-June-2019

    English

    Transforming Industry through CCUS

    Industry is the basis for prospering societies and central to economic development. As the source of almost one-quarter of CO2 emissions, it must also be a central part of the clean energy transition. Emissions from industry can be among the hardest to abate in the energy system, in particular due to process emissions that result from chemical or physical reactions and the need for high-temperature heat. A portfolio of technologies and approaches will be needed to address the decarbonisation challenge while supporting sustainable and competitive industries. Carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) is expected to play a critical role in this sustainable transformation. For some industrial and fuel transformation processes, CCUS is one of the most cost-effective solutions available for large-scale emissions reductions. In the IEA Clean Technology Scenario (CTS), which sets out a pathway consistent with the Paris Agreement climate ambition, CCUS contributes almost one-fifth of the emissions reductions needed across the industry sector. More than 28 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (GtCO2) is captured from industrial processes in the period to 2060, the majority of it from the cement, steel and chemical subsectors. A strengthened and tailored policy response will be needed to support the transformation of industry consistent with climate goals while preserving competitiveness. The development of CO2 transport and storage networks for industrial CCUS hubs can reduce unit costs through economies of scale and facilitate investment in CO2 capture facilities. Establishing markets for premium lower-carbon materials – such as cement, steel and chemicals – through public and private procurement can also accelerate the adoption of CCUS and other lower-carbon industrial processes.
  • 20-June-2019

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: United Kingdom 2019

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) regularly conducts in-depth peer reviews of the energy policies of its member countries, a process that supports energy policy development and encourages the exchange of international best practices and experiences. The United Kingdom is a global leader in decarbonisation, both in terms of actual emissions reductions and ambitions set out in five-year carbon budgets. The carbon price floor has supported coal-to-gas switching, which combined with a record investment in offshore wind and solar PV, is transforming the UK power sector. By 2030, wind and solar are expected to reach above 50%, more than in any other country. Solutions for flexible electricity markets and technologies need to be scaled up. Coal and nuclear power capacity is going to retire and new nuclear faces a weak outlook, the contribution of natural gas to meet peak demand is likely to increase. The UK has been able to stabilise production from the North Sea. Given its long term decline, however, oil & gas imports are critical. Maintaining open energy trade with the Continent and the world has to remain a top priority.The UK Clean Growth Strategy puts energy technology and innovation at the centre of its decarbonisation policy. The IEA underlines that the country’s offshore expertise is a strong basis for innovative technologies, such as carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) and also hydrogen, along with improving energy efficiency. In this report, the IEA provides recommendations to help the country guide the transformation of the UK energy sector and to meet its ambitious targets.
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