Publications


  • 16-June-2017

    English

    OECD Reviews of Innovation Policy: Norway 2017

    Following a remarkable transformation in the past century in research and innovation, in particular through the development of new technologies and processes in sectors such as oil and gas, shipbuilding and also fisheries and aquaculture, Norway is today increasingly facing a “triple transition imperative” in which it needs, first, to shift toward a more diversified and robust economy; second, to move to a more competitive, effective and efficient innovation system; and third, to support research and innovation activities that can confront an array of societal challenges (climate change, food security, aging, health and so on). The Long-Term Plan for Research and Higher Education 2015-2024 (LTP) launched by the Norwegian government has set the base to enhance the capacity of the research and higher education system to cope with these transition challenges. This report proposes recommendations to take advantage of the revision of this comprehensive strategic plan in 2018 to improve the horizontal coordination and add more concrete structural policy initiatives, without changing the plan’s general orientation nor giving up the sectorial and the consensus principles that form the basis of Norwegian policy making.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    OECD Investment Policy Reviews: Kazakhstan 2017

    This review, which was prepared in response to Kazakhstan's 2012 request to adhere to the Declaration on International Investment and Multinational Enterprises (OECD Declaration), analyses the general framework for investment as well as most recent reforms, and shows where further efforts are necessary. It assesses Kazakhstan’s ability to comply with the principles of openness, transparency and non-discrimination and its policy convergence with the OECD Declaration, including responsible business conduct practices. Capitalising on the OECD Policy Framework for Investment, this review studies other policy areas that are of key relevance to investment such as SME policy, infrastructure development, trade policy as well as anti-corruption efforts. Since the first review of Kazakhstan, in 2012, the authorities have made strides in opening the country to international investment and in improving the policy framework for investment as part of their efforts to diversify the economy to avoid continued overreliance on oil. Additional policy measures are nevertheless required to create a stimulating environment for investment if the government wants to fulfil its goal of economic diversification and sustainable development.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    Multi-dimensional Review of Kazakhstan - Volume 2. In-depth Analysis and Recommendations

    Kazakhstan has embarked upon an ambitious reform agenda to realise its aspiration of becoming one of the top 30 global economies by 2050. The country’s economy and society have undergone deep transformations since independence. To sustain economic progress, overcome recent difficulties, and drive improvements in well-being to realise its aspirations, Kazakhstan will need to address a number of challenges to ensure its economy becomes more productive and diverse, and is sufficiently flexible and resilient in the face of an ever-shifting external environment. This next stage of economic transformation will require continuing reforms. This report discusses policy actions to address four key obstacles to development in Kazakhstan, identified in Volume 1 of this review. It presents in-depth analysis and recommendations to improve the economy’s resilience through diversification, to mobilise financing for development, to transform the role of the state in the economy, including through privatisation, and to improve the effectiveness of environmental regulations.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Kazakhstan

    Kazakhstan has experienced a long period of high and sustained economic growth, largely driven by oil and gas exports. However, the drop in 2014 of the international price of oil highlighted the risks of dependence on natural resource activities. Kazakhstan must diversify its economic base to ensure that it can continue to “catch up” and move into higher value-added goods and services. This review looks at how a modern approach to regional development can help Kazakhstan by mobilising the growth potential of different parts of the economy and territory, supporting economic diversification and reducing regional inequalities.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    OECD Integrity Scan of Kazakhstan - Preventing Corruption for a Competitive Economy

    This report looks at how to curb corruption and build a more competitive economy in the Republic of Kazakhstan by assessing four crucial factors: governance, prevention, detection, and prosecution and recovery. In its analysis, it draws on good international practices as well as OECD instruments and tools in 15 policy areas: regulatory governance, competition policy, public financial management, development co-operation, public sector integrity, public procurement, tax administration and transparency, export credits, lobbying, whistleblower protection, business sector integrity, criminalising bribery, civil society, and media. The report provides recommendations for improving Kazakhstan’s laws and policies as well as effectively implementing them in each of these areas.

  • 14-June-2017

    English

    Guidance to Assemble and Manage Multidisciplinary Teams for Extractive Contract Negotiations

    The Guidance is intended to offer host governments the tools they need to assemble and manage a multidisciplinary team, and engage effectively in extractive contract negotiations. The Guidance aims to help governments to put in place recommended processes and identify the skills that governments may need to prepare for and conduct effective contract negotiations. This Guidance further suggests ways to ensure coordination within government and better integration between government officials and expert advisers. Annexed to this Guidance is a Terms of Reference Template that governments may use to recruit and to monitor external advisers engaged during extractive contract negotiations. The Template can also be utilised by support providers who recruit external advisers on behalf of governments for the same purpose. While recognising that human and institutional capacity building is a long-term endeavour, the Guidance suggests, wherever possible, practical ways to capture and retain the necessary soft and technical skills for successful negotiations.

  • 9-June-2017

    English

    OECD Reviews of Innovation Policy: Finland 2017

    Although Finland achieved a widely acclaimed transformation to become a leading knowledge-based economy in the late 20th century, the 2009 recession and disruptive change contributing to a deep restructuring of the information and communication technology (ICT) industry and the downsizing of traditional sectors have weighed on the economy, productivity growth and international competitiveness. Numerous policy reforms have since been undertaken, and public and private investment, especially in applied R&D, has been cut back. Strengthening and lifting Finland’s innovation system out of a period of uncertainty requires a coherent and unified new vision for science, technology and innovation (STI), renewed investment and policy instruments. This vision should be oriented towards renewal tackling societal challenges and developing new knowledge-based competitive advantages at global scale. Success calls for better co-ordination and co-operation among policy actors and national and regional-levels, and further internationalisation.

  • 9-June-2017

    English

    Unlocking the Potential of Youth Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries - From Subsistence to Performance

    Demographic pressure and the youth bulge in the developing world pose a major employment challenge. This situation is exacerbated by insufficient job creation, scarce formal wage employment opportunities and vulnerability in the workplace. For these reasons, fostering youth entrepreneurship has gained importance in the global and national development policy agenda. This report aims to contribute to the ongoing debate on the role of youth entrepreneurship in generating employment in developing countries. It is based on the analysis of mixed labour force and enterprise surveys conducted in Côte d’Ivoire, Madagascar, Peru and Viet Nam, as well as evidence on the impact of entrepreneurship programmes. This report’s findings add to the global debate on youth entrepreneurship in three important ways. First, it constitutes an unprecedented effort to capture the real situations and multiple faces of young entrepreneurs in selected developing countries. Second, it provides new empirical evidence on the determinants of youth entrepreneurial performance. Third, it proposes a policy roadmap based on lessons learned from recent meta-analyses of the effectiveness of entrepreneurship programmes.

  • 8-June-2017

    English

    Services Trade Policies and the Global Economy

    This book synthesises recent work by the OECD analysing services trade policies and quantifying their impacts on imports and exports, the performance of manufacturing and services sectors, and how services trade restrictions influence the decisions and outcomes of firms engaged in international markets. Based on the OECD Services Trade Restrictiveness Index (STRI) - a unique, evidence-based tool that provides snapshots of regulations affecting trade in services in 22 sectors across 44 countries (representing over 80% of global trade in services) - the analysis highlights the magnitude, nature and impact of the costs entailed by restrictive services trade policies. The new evidence uncovered is meant to inform trade policy makers and the private sector about the likely effects of unilateral or concerted regulatory reforms and help prioritise policy action.

    Please consult oe.cd/stri for further information and access to the STRI interactive online tools.

  • 8-juin-2017

    Français

    Une meilleure planification pour une meilleure gouvernance budgétaire en Tunisie - Le cadre de dépenses à moyen terme

    Pour asseoir les bases d’une gouvernance publique efficace et transparente, la Tunisie a entrepris, depuis 2004, une réforme tendant au passage vers la gestion budgétaire par objectifs (GBO). Parmi les composantes de cette dernière figure le développement de la programmation triennale et glissante, grâce à la mise en place de cadres budgétaires et de dépenses à moyen terme (CDMT). Cet examen offre un aperçu sur la démarche existante de préparation et d’utilisation du CDMT en mettant en regard l’exemple tunisien avec les grandes tendances observées dans les pays membres de l’OCDE. Il examine les cadres à moyen terme, les instruments de planification, les instruments de programmation, les activités de préparation du budget, et enfin, le calendrier budgétaire. Cet examen donne également un aperçu sur les principaux facteurs d’échec et de succès dans l’instauration des cadres à moyen terme et offre des suggestions pour améliorer ce processus en Tunisie.

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