Publications


  • 26-October-2016

    English

    Small Modular Reactors - Nuclear Energy Market Potential for Near-term Deployment

    Recent interest in small modular reactors (SMRs) is being driven by a desire to reduce the total capital costs associated with nuclear power plants and to provide power to small grid systems. According to estimates available today, if all the competitive advantages of SMRs were realised, including serial production, optimised supply chains and smaller financing costs, SMRs could be expected to have lower absolute and specific (per-kWe) construction costs than large reactors. Although the economic parameters of SMRs are not yet fully determined, a potential market exists for this technology, particularly in energy mixes with large shares of renewables.

    This report assesses the size of the market for SMRs that are currently being developed and that have the potential to broaden the ways of deploying nuclear power in different parts of the world. The study focuses on light water SMRs that are expected to be constructed in the coming decades and that strongly rely on serial, factory-based production of reactor modules. In a high-case scenario, up to 21 GWe of SMRs could be added globally by 2035, representing approximately 3% of total installed nuclear capacity.

  • 25-October-2016

    English

    Medium-Term Renewable Energy Market Report 2016

    Energy efficiency improvements over the last 25 years saved a cumulative USD 5.7 trillion in energy expenditures. This virtual supply of energy generates multiple benefits for governments, businesses and households, including greater energy security from reduced dependence on energy imports and billions of tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions reductions.

    Strengthening our understanding of the energy efficiency market and the prospects over the medium term is becoming increasingly important. The 2015 Energy Efficiency Market Report (EEMR) evaluates the impact of energy efficiency in the energy system and assesses the scale and outlook for further energy efficiency investment using detailed country-by-country energy efficiency indicator data and IEA expertise.

    This year’s report includes an in-depth look into the buildings energy efficiency market and the electricity sector. Energy efficiency investments in the buildings sector totalled between USD 90 billion in 2014. In the electricity sector, energy efficiency has proved critical in flattening electricity consumption in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development member countries, driving utilities to adapt their business models.

    Promoting and expanding energy efficiency markets is a worldwide phenomenon, and EEMR 2015 presents a number of case studies at the national, state and municipal level. These include examinations of Latin America’s two largest economies, Brazil and Mexico, which are looking to efficiency to boost productivity and social development. Energy-exporting countries like Saudi Arabia and the Russian Federation are also increasingly turning to efficiency to increase exports and reduce the costs of growing domestic energy consumption. In addition to national governments, major urban areas such as Tokyo, Seoul and Paris are increasingly enabling energy efficiency investment.

  • 25-October-2016

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Turkey 2016

    Since the last International Energy Agency (IEA) review of Turkey’s energy policies, the country’s reliance on natural gas use has grown along with rising oil and gas imports, leaving the Turkish economy increasingly exposed to the volatility in oil and gas prices. Turkey aims to promote sustainable economic growth - the IEA urges the government to set a longer term energy policy agenda for 2030. However, owing to declining global liquefied natural gas prices, Turkey now has an opportunity to reduce its single supplier dependence, build a competitive gas market, and move ahead with its plans to create a regional gas hub.

    Turkey’s power sector reforms have attracted private investment and fostered economic growth and energy access. Integration into a regional gas and electricity trade framework is moving along as a result of the first interconnection of Turkey with the European electricity grid and the construction of the Trans-Anatolian Natural Gas Pipeline that will deliver gas from the Caspian to Turkey and the European Union.

    In that context, the IEA urges Turkey to complete the liberalisation of its electricity and gas markets in order to attract critically needed investment. The review also notes that Turkey should set up independent transmission system operators, competitive wholesale markets, and foster resilient and modern gas and electricity infrastructure.

    This review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Turkey and provides recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide the country towards a more secure, sustainable and affordable energy future.

  • 24-October-2016

    English

    Green Growth in Bandung, Indonesia

    Bandung Metropolitan Area (BMA) is home to 8.6 million people and is Indonesia’s second-largest urban agglomeration. Rapid growth has created a number of challenges for the city, including traffic congestion, air pollution, municipal solid waste and water access and management. The BMA also faces several acute disaster risks primarily related to flooding and seismic activity. The area will need to address these challenges in order to continue sustainable development and to benefit from its environmental assets.

    Urban green growth policies encourage economic development while reducing either its negative environmental or the consumption of natural resources and environmental assets, including water, energy and undeveloped land.  This report, part of the OECD Urban Green Growth in Dynamic Asia project, explores policies, practices and governance systems to promote green growth in Bandung, Indonesia, and provides recommendations for enhancing Bandung’s green growth potential.

  • 24-October-2016

    English

    Open Government in Indonesia

    This review analyses open government principles and practices in Indonesia, highlighting opportunities for - as well as barriers to - achieving the country’s public governance reforms. It covers a wide range of topics, including the co-ordination of open government reforms by the centre of government, citizen engagement mechanisms, anti-corruption and integrity, digital government and open government data, budget transparency, public sector innovation, and the link between open government reforms and the UN Sustainable Development Goals. It provides concrete recommendations on how to further strengthen and embed openness in policy making at all levels of government, drawing on the best experiences of OECD countries.

  • 20-October-2016

    English

    Start-up Latin America 2016 - Building an Innovative Future

    Start-ups are gaining momentum in Latin America. Start-up Latin America 2016: Building an innovative future reviews the dynamics of start-ups and the policies for start-up promotion in four countries in the region –  Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru. The report reviews the policy mix for start-up promotion and highlights the progress made by each country and future challenges. It identifies good practices in promoting start-ups and lessons learned in Latin America in the design and implementation of policies.

  • 20-October-2016

    English

    Trends in Risk Communication Policies and Practices

    Good risk communication is crucial for raising awareness among citizens and business about the risks their countries face. However, many countries have seen their risk communication tools fail in the past, leading to persistently low levels of risk awareness, especially in the absence of recent disasters. This OECD report surveys current trends in risk communication policies and practices across OECD and partner countries. It seeks to understand why risk communication tools have failed and what OECD countries can do to improve the effectiveness of their risk communication policies. Based on an OECD-wide survey, the report evaluates the degree to which countries have used  risk communication tools to not only increase risk awareness, but to inform stakeholders about potential preparedness and prevention measures they can take to boost their resilience to future risks.

  • 19-October-2016

    English

    OECD Reviews of School Resources: Czech Republic 2016

    The effective use of school resources is a policy priority across OECD countries. The OECD Reviews of School Resources explore how resources can be governed, distributed, utilised and managed to improve the quality, equity and efficiency of school education.
    The series considers four types of resources: financial resources, such as public funding of individual schools; human resources, such as teachers, school leaders and education administrators; physical resources, such as location, buildings and equipment; and other resources, such as learning time.
    This series offers timely policy advice to both governments and the education community. It includes both country reports and thematic studies.

  • 19-October-2016

    English

    CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2016

    In recognition of the fundamental importance of understanding energy related environmental issues, the IEA CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion provides a full analysis of emissions stemming from energy use. This annual publication has become an essential tool for analysts and policy makers in many international fora such as the Conference of the Parties, which will be meeting in Marrakesh, Morocco, from 7 to 18 November 2016.

    The data in this book are designed to assist in understanding the evolution of the emissions of CO2 from 1971 to 2014 for 150 countries and regions by sector and by fuel. Emissions were calculated using IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  • 19-October-2016

    English

    Risk Management by State-Owned Enterprises and their Ownership

    Taking risks is a fundamental driving force in business and entrepreneurship. To reap the full rewards of risk-taking, however, firms need to have in place effective risk management practices. This publication provides a stocktaking of ways in which SOEs and those exercising the state’s ownership role address the issue of risk management from the perspective of corporate governance (“risk governance”), as recommended in the OECD Guidelines on Corporate Governance of State-Owned Enterprises. The report looks at this issue from three perspectives: by taking stock, first, of national legal and regulatory SOE risk management frameworks, and then by taking stock of risk-management practices at the level of the SOE and then at the level of the state.

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