Publications


  • 19-April-2018

    English

    Education for a Bright Future in Greece

    After a decade of severe fiscal crisis also impacting education, Greece is looking ahead. Now is the time to invest effectively in education and define a forward-looking path for Greece. Building on the current reform agenda, this report offers an analysis of the context and underlying policy issues that once addressed, can contribute to raising the quality and equity of education in Greece.Drawing on evidence and international experience, the review highlights policy options that can guide and enhance current reform efforts in Greece in four areas: effective governance; policies for school improvement; efficiency, equity and quality of the education system; tertiary education. How can the governance and financing of Greek education be streamlined and improved? How can Greece achieve greater equity in educational provision and student outcomes? How can the Greek - qualified and well engaged - teaching force help promote school improvement? Last but not least, how can higher education help Greece restore prosperity?This report takes a hard look at the above issues, and many others. It will offer precious insights to policy makers and the education community.
  • 19-avril-2018

    Français

    Guide OCDE sur le devoir de diligence applicable aux chaînes d'approvisionnement responsables dans le secteur de l'habillement et de la chaussure

    Le Guide OCDE sur le devoir de diligence applicable aux chaînes d’approvisionnement responsables dans le secteur de l’habillement et de la chaussure a pour but d’aider les entreprises de ce même secteur à mettre en œuvre les recommandations des Principes directeurs de l’OCDE à l’intention des entreprises multinationales portant sur l’application du devoir de diligence tout au long de la chaîne d’approvisionnement. Ce guide a également pour but d’éviter les incidences négatives liées aux activités et aux modes d’approvisionnements de ces entreprises, et propose de traiter ces incidences négatives. Ce guide s’inscrit dans la continuité des Principes directeurs de l’OCDE, l’objectif étant de garantir que les entreprises du secteur de l’habillement et de la chaussure exercent leurs activités dans le respect des politiques publiques nationales, et que, la confiance mutuelle entre les entreprises et les sociétés au sein desquelles elles opèrent, soit renforcée. Ce Guide servira également d’appui aux entreprises pour mettre en œuvre les recommandations relatives au devoir de diligence figurant dans les Principes Directeurs des Nations Unies relatifs aux entreprises et aux droits de l’homme. Le contenu de ce Guide est par ailleurs conforme à celui de la Déclaration de l'Organisation Internationale du Travail (OIT) relative aux principes et aux droits fondamentaux au travail, à celui des Conventions et Recommandations de l’OIT, et à celui de la Déclaration de principes tripartite de l'OIT sur les entreprises multinationales et la politique sociale. Avec ses modules sur l’exercice du devoir de diligence dans certaines zones à risques spécifiques, ce Guide se veut exhaustif pour permettre aux entreprises du secteur de l’habillement et de la chaussure d’exercer leurs activités et de s’approvisionner de manière responsable.
     
    Ce Guide est le fruit d’un processus multipartite impliquant des pays membres et non-membres de l’OCDE, ainsi que des représentants d’entreprises, de syndicats et de la société civile. Il a été supervisé par le Groupe de travail sur la conduite responsable des entreprises. Ce Guide s’appuie sur les rapports détaillés que les Points de contact nationaux pour les Principes directeurs de l’OCDE (PCN) en France et en Italie ont rédigés au sujet de l’application des Principes directeurs de l’OCDE dans le secteur de l’habillement et de la chaussure. Il fait suite aux déclarations des PCN de juin 2013 et de juin 2014 après l’effondrement tragique du Rana Plaza.
  • 19-April-2018

    English

    Meeting Policy Challenges for a Sustainable Bioeconomy

    This publication investigates key aspects surrounding the sustainability of bioeconomy development: the use of biomass as feedstock for future production;  the design and building of biorefineries for the manufacture of a range of fuels, chemicals and materials, and also for electricity generation; and the use of biotechnologies such as synthetic biology, metabolic engineering and gene editing.Today more than 50 countries have a dedicated bioeconomy strategy or related policies. While the bioeconomy is consistent with sustainability policy (examples are the circular economy, the UN Sustainable Development Goals, green growth, re-industrialisation, rural regeneration, climate change mitigation), synergies must be ensured to avoid over-exploitation of natural resources and conflicting global needs.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    OECD Economic Survey of Costa Rica: Research Findings on Productivity

    This volume collects four studies that were prepared as background research to the 2018 OECD Economic Survey of Costa Rica. Using firm-level, trade and sectorial data, these studies seek to provide insights into the trends in productivity and its determinants in Costa Rica. This volume represents a collaborative effort by a team of researchers from the OECD Secretariat and official agencies of Costa Rica. 
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees

    Behind every migration statistic, there are individuals or families starting a new life in a new place. Local authorities, in co-ordination with all levels of government and other local partners, play a key role in integrating these newcomers and empowering them to contribute to their new communities. Integration needs to happen where people are: in their workplaces, their neighbourhoods, the schools to which they send their children and the public spaces where they will spend their free time. This report describes what it takes to formulate a place-based approach to integration through concerted efforts across levels of government as well as between state and non-state actors. It draws on both quantitative evidence, from a statistical database, and qualitative evidence from a survey of 72 cities. These include nine large European cities (Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Berlin, Glasgow, Gothenburg, Paris, Rome and Vienna) and one small city in Germany (Altena), which are the subject of in-depth case studies. The report also presents a 12-point checklist, a tool that any city or region – in Europe, the OECD or beyond – can use to work across levels of government and with other local actors in their efforts to promote more effective integration of migrants.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees in Altena

    Altena is a small industrial town in the Land of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. The city has experienced a significant decline in its population in recent decades and further substantial decreases are predicted through 2030. In this context, the municipality has come to approach migrant integration as a chance to revive the city, counteract demographic change and fill existing labour force demands. In 2015, the city took on 100 more asylum seekers and refugees than required by federal allocation. In 2017, migrants made up 11.3% of the total population of Altena and the majority (54%) have lived there for longer than ten years. This report presents the way Altena and its state and non-state partners are addressing migrant integration issues and opportunities. In particular, the report sheds light on how refugees and asylum seekers have benefited from housing and civic participation programmes as well as the local responses to the peak in refugee and asylum seeker arrivals since 2015. In such a context, when migrant integration is part of the local development strategy, one key question is 'How to encourage migrants stay in Altena?'.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Environmental Policy Toolkit for SME Greening in EU Eastern Partnership Countries

    This toolkit, based on existing good practice, aims to help governments in the EU’s Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine) to design and implement key instruments to promote environmental compliance and green business practices among small and medium-sized enterprises. Reducing the environmental impact of SMEs in both manufacturing and services is a key success factor in greening the economy. At the same time, improving environmental performance is a significant business opportunity for SMEs as important suppliers of goods and services. Developed under the EaP GREEN project, this report will be of interest to environmental and economic ministries, as well as business associations and non-governmental and academic institutions in EaP countries.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Japan: Promoting Inclusive Growth for an Ageing Society

    Japan has achieved a comparatively high level of well-being: skill levels are high, unemployment is low and life expectancy at birth is the highest in the OECD. Since its launch in 2013, Abenomics has had a positive effect on the economy, and per capita output growth has picked up. However, to achieve inclusive growth and greater well-being, Japan needs to address important challenges to foster fiscal sustainability, narrow the productivity gap with leading OECD countries and manage the demographic transition. A new fiscal plan going beyond achieving a primary surplus should lay out concrete measures to raise revenues and control spending. As Japan’s population ages, using all available talent in the labour market and achieving gender equality are key to overcome labour shortages. Boosting productivity, which has been stagnant, will require increasing returns from R&D, capitalising on the digital economy, fostering the dynamism of SMEs, and reducing barriers to foreign direct investment and trade to promote greater integration into global value chains. Japan’s education system is one of the top performers in the OECD, but there is scope to further invest in teachers and schools. Finally, further action to foster green growth and environmental quality as well as effectively leveraging upcoming international sports events, such as the Rugby World Cup 2019 and the Olympic and Paralympic Games 2020, would also boost local development and inclusive growth. The complementarity of reforms needed to achieve inclusive and sustainable growth in in an aging society makes a compelling case for a comprehensive approach.
  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Low-Carbon Transition in the Cement Industry

    The cement sector is the third-largest industrial energy consumer and the second-largest industrial CO2 emitter globally. Rising global population and urbanisation patterns, coupled with infrastructure development needs, drive up the demand for cement and concrete and increase pressure to accelerate action in reducing the carbon footprint of cement production.

    Under a scenario that considers announced carbon mitigation commitments and energy efficiency targets by countries, the cement sector would increase its direct CO2 emissions just 4% globally by 2050, for an expected growth of 12% in cement production over the same period. However, more ambitious action would be needed to achieve global climate goals.

    This Technology Roadmap builds on the long-standing collaboration of the IEA with the Cement Sustainability Initiative (CSI) of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). It provides an update of the Cement Technology Roadmap 2009: Carbon Emissions Reductions up to 2050, and sets a strategy for the cement sector to achieve the decoupling of cement production growth from related direct CO2 emissions through improving energy efficiency, switching to fuels that are less carbon intensive, reducing the clinker to cement ratio, and implementing emerging and innovative technologies such as carbon capture. The report therefore outlines a detailed action plan for specific stakeholders to 2050 as a reference and a source of inspiration for international and national policy makers to support evidence-based decisions and regulations. 

  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Working Together for Local Integration of Migrants and Refugees in Amsterdam

    In Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 51.66% of the population was born outside of the country or has at least one parent born abroad. Amsterdam is proud of its cultural and ethnical diversity and actively works to attract international students and high-skilled migrants. Like many European cities, Amsterdam experienced a peak in refugees and asylum seekers arrivals in 2015 and in response has implemented a holistic integration model, which starts at the moment migrants arrive and supports them for their first three years. Migrants are not considered as a minority group with different needs, but rather as one group among others with specific characteristics (such as women, the elderly, the disabled, LGBT) whose outcomes are monitored to identify potential structural gaps in their access to opportunities and services. This work compiles data and qualitative evidence on how local actions for integration, across a number of sectors, are being designed and implemented by the City of Amsterdam and its partners within a multi-level governance framework.
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