Rwanda


  • 31-July-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to South Africa's Economy

    Immigrants contribute considerably to South Africa’s economy. In contrast to popular perception, immigration is not associated with a reduction of the employment rate of the native-born population in South Africa, and some groups of immigrants are likely to increase employment opportunities for the native-born. In part due to the high employment rate of the immigrant population itself, immigrants also raise the income per capita in South Africa. In addition, immigrants have a positive impact on the government’s fiscal balance, mostly because they tend to pay more in taxes. Policies focused on immigrant integration and fighting discrimination would further enhance the economic contribution of immigrants in South Africa.How Immigrants Contribute to South Africa’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary, and in some cases primary, data sources.
  • 2-May-2018

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    Immigrant workers contribute positively to Rwanda’s economy, says new ILO-OECD Development Centre report

    Labour migration has only recently emerged as an economic issue in Rwanda. A joint report by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organisation (ILO), How Immigrants contribute to Rwanda’s economy, provides new insights and makes policy recommendations to enhance that contribution.

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  • 28-March-2018

    English

    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda's Economy

    Immigrants' contribution to Rwanda's economy is relatively small, but growing. Unlike in many other developing countries, immigrants in Rwanda are on average better educated and work in more productive sectors than the native-born population. Although immigration is associated with a small reduction in the employment rate of the native-born population, immigrants' contribution to the Rwandan gross domestic product is higher than their share in employment. In addition, immigrants contribute more in taxes than they receive in government benefits, leading to a positive effect on the fiscal balance. A mix of migration policies, aimed at meeting labour market needs and fostering immigrants’ integration, and non-migration policies, intending to leverage the impact of immigration on the economy, would help enhance the contribution of immigrants to Rwanda’s economy.
     
    How Immigrants Contribute to Rwanda’s Economy is the result of a project carried out by the OECD Development Centre and the International Labour Organization, with support from the European Union. The project aimed to analyse several economic impacts – on the labour market, economic growth, and public finance – of immigration in ten partner countries: Argentina, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and Thailand. The empirical evidence stems from a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses of secondary, and in some cases primary, data sources.
  • 24-mai-2017

    Français

    Rwanda Perspectives Économiques en Afrique 2017

    La croissance du PIB réel a ralenti pour se chiffrer à 6.0 % en 2016, et l’inflation globale a augmenté de 7.2 %, atteignant le plus haut niveau depuis 2012. Le Rwanda connaît toujours la paix et la stabilité. Les préparatifs pour l’élection présidentielle d’août 2017 ont débuté et la Constitution a été révisée afin de modifier l’encadrement du nombre de mandats présidentiels.

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  • 22-mai-2017

    Français

  • 1-avril-2016

    Français

    Les recettes fiscales en hausse sont essentielles au développement économique des pays africains

    Les recettes fiscales des pays d’Afrique progressent en proportion du revenu national, selon la première édition des Statistiques des recettes publiques en Afrique.

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  • 29-juillet-2015

    Français

    Rwanda perspectives économiques en Afrique 2015

    En 2014, le produit intérieur brut (PIB) du Rwanda a augmenté de 7.0 %, un taux supérieur aux 6.0 % initialement attendus et aux 4.7 % enregistrés en 2013.

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  • 23-April-2015

    English, PDF, 276kb

    Policy Note on Participation of Developing Countries in Global Value Chains

    4-page policy note detailing the key results and recommendations from OECD Trade Policy Paper 179 on the Participation of Developing Countries in Global Value Chains.

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  • 23-April-2015

    English, PDF, 711kb

    Summary Paper of Report on Participation of Developing countries in Global Value Chains

    24-page summary paper of the OECD trade policy paper #179 on participation of developing countries in global value chains available on the OECD iLibrary.

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