By Date


  • 19-June-2017

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Morelos, Mexico

    Morelos is one of the smallest states in Mexico, and close to Mexico City. It contains a number of economic and environmental assets in its territory, but has weak productivity levels. This review looks at how Morelos is seeking to boost its economy, particularly through inclusive growth policies such as enhancing human capital and promoting innovation. It also highlights areas of untapped potential for economic growth across rural areas and the tourism and environmental sectors, and offers suggestions for how Morelos could address governance challenges.

    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 22-May-2017

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

    Related Documents
  • 6-April-2017

    English, PDF, 420kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Mexico

    Mexico had the 33rd lowest tax wedge among the 35 OECD member countries in 2016. The country occupied the same position in 2015. The average single worker in Mexico faced a tax wedge of 20.1% in 2016 compared with the OECD average of 36.0%.

  • 30-March-2017

    English

    OECD Integrity Review of Mexico - Taking a Stronger Stance Against Corruption

    The OECD's Integrity Review of Mexico is one of the first peer reviews to apply the new 2017 Recommendation of the Council on Public Integrity. It assesses i) the coherence and comprehensiveness of the evolving public integrity system; ii) the extent to which Mexico’s new reforms cultivate a culture of integrity across the public sector; and iii) the effectiveness of increasingly stringent accountability mechanisms. In addition, the Review includes a sectoral focus on public procurement, one of the largest areas of government spending in the country and is considered a high-risk government activity for fraud and corruption. The OECD finds that Mexico’s recent integrity reforms have the potential to be "game-changers" in the country’s fight against corruption, however, ensuring successful implementation remains the main challenge going forward. As such, the Review provides several proposals for action aimed at strengthening institutional arrangements and improving vertical and horizontal co-ordination, closing remaining gaps in various existing legal/policy frameworks (protection for whistle-blowers, risk management, administrative disciplinary procedures, etc.), as well as supporting awareness-raising and capacity-building efforts to instill integrity values and ensure the sustainability of reforms.

  • 28-March-2017

    English

    Tax and Skills: Key findings for all countries

    These country specific notes provide figures and commentary from the Taxation and Skills publication that examines how tax policy can encourage skills development in OECD countries.

    Related Documents
  • 14-March-2017

    English

    Energy Policies Beyond IEA Countries: Mexico 2017

    This first review of Mexico’s energy policies by the International Energy Agency comes at a momentous time for the country’s energy sector. The broad-based Energy Reform, beginning with the Constitutional changes of December 2013, has continued at a steady and impressive pace. Its reach and scope amounts to one of the most ambitious energy system transformations in decades. The IEA applauds the government of Mexico for the progress made to date.

    Starting from a largely closed and monopoly-driven energy market, the reform has taken concrete steps to harness market forces to attract investments and increase production while ensuring transparency and rule of law, improving energy security and strengthening the environmental sustainability of the energy sector.

    Some policy areas, such as promoting competition and redesigning emergency preparedness, will have to remain a priority. The transition to open energy markets should continue in a transparent manner, and with regulatory certainty. The new roles and responsibilities for the public and private entities, in particular for energy supply emergencies and energy data collection, should be defined well. It is also critical to ensure sufficient resources for the several new or strengthened regulatory authorities.

    For the long term, as Mexico’s population, cities and economy are projected to grow strongly, a cross-sectoral approach is required to limit the increase in energy demand and energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. This review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Mexico and provides recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide the country towards a more secure, sustainable and affordable energy future.

  • 17-February-2017

    English

    Mexico - strengthening the competition and regulation framework

    This multi-year project aims to improve the competitiveness of the Mexican economy by reforming and modifying the regulatory and institutional framework to support higher levels of investment, employment and growth.

    Related Documents
  • 15-February-2017

    Spanish

  • 15-February-2017

    German

  • 15-février-2017

    Français

  • 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 > >>