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  • 29-May-2017

    English

    Japan should do more to help young people take part in the labour market

    Japan should step up efforts to improve young people’s job prospects and reduce the share of 15-29 year-olds who are not in employment, education or training (the “NEETs”), according to a new OECD report.

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  • 29-May-2017

    English

    Investing in Youth: Japan

    The present report on Japan is the seventh report in the Investing in Youth series. In three statistical chapters, the report provides an overview of the labour market situation of young people in Japan, presents a portrait of young people who are not in employment, education or training (the NEETs) and analyses the income situation of young people in Japan. Two policy chapters provide recommendations on how Japan can improve the school-to-work transition of disadvantaged young people, and on how employment, social and training programmes can help the NEETs find their way back into education or work.

    Earlier reviews in the same series have looked at youth policies in Brazil (2014), Latvia and Tunisia (2015), Australia, Lithuania and Sweden (2016).

  • 14-April-2017

    English, PDF, 343kb

    Japan Policy Brief: Improving the labour market outcomes of women

    Facilitating female employment is particularly important given Japan’s shrinking and ageing population, which has already contributed to labour shortages.

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  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Japan: Boosting Growth and Well-being in an Ageing Society

    With 25 years of sluggish economic growth, Japan’s per capita income has fallen from a level matching the average of the top half of OECD countries in the early 1990s to 14% below that today. Weak growth, together with rapid population ageing, has driven public debt into uncharted territory. Revitalising growth is thus the top priority for the Japanese government. With the labour force shrinking more rapidly than the population, per capita output can only grow through improvements in labour productivity and labour force participation. Japan’s highly-skilled labour force and its technological leadership can help close the gap with leading OECD countries in per capita income. But broad-based structural reforms, as envisaged in the third arrow of Abenomics, are needed to allow these strengths to fully achieve their potential. The initial impact of Abenomics in 2013 was impressive, and the reform process needs to continue.

  • 10-June-2015

    English, PDF, 355kb

    Japan Policy Brief: Greater Gender Equality for More Inclusive Growth

    To achieve greater gender equality in employment and more inclusive growth, Japan needs to change the workplace culture and ensure that the tax and social security systems do not reduce work incentives for second earners in households.

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  • 19-January-2015

    English

    Japan can do more to encourage smooth transition of laid-off workers back into jobs, says OECD

    Japan could help laid-off workers find a job more quickly by improving co-ordination between public employment services and companies, as well as ensuring that all workers benefit from adequate Employment Insurance (EI) benefits, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 19-January-2015

    English

    Back to Work: Japan - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over the course of their working lives. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in the jobs they held prior to displacement. Helping displaced workers get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is the second in a series of reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that Japanese employers and the government go to considerable lengths to avoid the displacement of regular workers while also providing considerable income and re-employment support to many of the workers whose jobs cannot be preserved. Challenges for labour market programmes include expanding labour market mobility between regular jobs, improving co-ordination between private and public re-employment assistance for displaced workers, and avoiding that job displacement pushes older workers to the margins of the labour market.

  • 3-septembre-2014

    Français

    Perspectives de l'emploi de l'OCDE - Notes par Pays

    Note par pays sur la situation sur le marché du travail, les salaires, la qualité de l'emploi.

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  • 31-mars-2014

    Français

    L’égalité hommes-femmes peut stimuler l’économie

    Dans tous les pays, il est difficile de concilier activité professionnelle et vie de famille, mais cela est d’autant plus vrai au Japon. Encore plus qu’ailleurs dans l’OCDE, les Japonais et les Japonaises doivent choisir entre famille et travail. Les hommes choisissent le travail, les femmes moins, mais dans l’ensemble, les naissances sont rares et l’emploi des femmes est trop faible.

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