Economie


  • 18-April-2018

    English

    Japan: Promoting Inclusive Growth for an Ageing Society

    Japan has achieved a comparatively high level of well-being: skill levels are high, unemployment is low and life expectancy at birth is the highest in the OECD. Since its launch in 2013, Abenomics has had a positive effect on the economy, and per capita output growth has picked up. However, to achieve inclusive growth and greater well-being, Japan needs to address important challenges to foster fiscal sustainability, narrow the productivity gap with leading OECD countries and manage the demographic transition. A new fiscal plan going beyond achieving a primary surplus should lay out concrete measures to raise revenues and control spending. As Japan’s population ages, using all available talent in the labour market and achieving gender equality are key to overcome labour shortages. Boosting productivity, which has been stagnant, will require increasing returns from R&D, capitalising on the digital economy, fostering the dynamism of SMEs, and reducing barriers to foreign direct investment and trade to promote greater integration into global value chains. Japan’s education system is one of the top performers in the OECD, but there is scope to further invest in teachers and schools. Finally, further action to foster green growth and environmental quality as well as effectively leveraging upcoming international sports events, such as the Rugby World Cup 2019 and the Olympic and Paralympic Games 2020, would also boost local development and inclusive growth. The complementarity of reforms needed to achieve inclusive and sustainable growth in in an aging society makes a compelling case for a comprehensive approach.
  • 12-April-2018

    English

    OECD-Keidanren-BIAC-JCER Joint Seminar on “The Digital Economy”

    It is a pleasure to be with you today at what is now a regular and highly valued dialogue between the OECD and the Japanese business community.

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  • 4-octobre-2017

    Français

    Assurer la viabilité des finances publiques au Japon dans le contexte d'une population déclinante et vieillissante

    Compte tenu d’une dette publique brute égale à 219 % du PIB, la situation budgétaire du Japon est inédite et menace l’économie du pays.

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  • 28-septembre-2017

    Français

    Stimuler la productivité pour une croissance inclusive au Japon

    La croissance de la productivité n’a jamais été aussi faible que depuis la crise financière mondiale de 2008 et les inégalités de revenu n’ont jamais été aussi marquées qu’aujourd’hui au Japon, mais aussi dans l’OCDE.

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  • 20-July-2017

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Asian Countries 2017 - Trends in Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore

    The Revenue Statistics in Asian Countries publication is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration and the OECD Development Centre. It compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for Indonesia, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database which is a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to Asian countries enables comparisons about tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among Asian economies and between OECD and Asian economies.
  • 13-April-2017

    English

    Presentation of the 2017 Economic Survey of Japan

    It is a great pleasure to be back in Tokyo to present the OECD’s 2017 Economic Survey of Japan. Let me thank the Japanese Government, in particular the Cabinet Office, for their support in the preparation of this Survey.

  • 13-avril-2017

    Français

    Japon : stimuler l’emploi et la productivité pour promouvoir la croissance inclusive et faire face aux défis démographiques

    Il ressort d’un nouveau rapport de l’OCDE que l’économie japonaise s’accélère et qu’elle crée des emplois. La dernière Étude économique de l'OCDE consacrée au Japon, présentée à Tokyo par le Secrétaire général de l’OCDE, M. Angel Gurría, constate que, depuis quelques années, le taux de croissance par habitant au Japon est comparable à celui des autres pays de l’OCDE, ce qui constitue une nette amélioration.

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  • 29-November-2016

    English

    Revenue Statistics in Asian Countries 2016 - Trends in Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore

    This publication compiles comparable tax revenue statistics for Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore. The model is the OECD Revenue Statistics database – a fundamental reference, backed by a well-established methodology, for OECD member countries. Extending the OECD methodology to Asian countries enables comparisons about tax levels and tax structures on a consistent basis, both among Asian economies and between OECD and Asian economies. This work has been is jointly undertaken by the OECD Centre for Tax Policy and Administration and the OECD Development Centre.
  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Remarks at Tokyo experts meeting on international finance and the global economy ahead of the G7 Summit

    Prime Minister, Ministers, thank you for the invitation to share with you our thinking on the global economic outlook and the challenges ahead.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Japan: Boosting Growth and Well-being in an Ageing Society

    With 25 years of sluggish economic growth, Japan’s per capita income has fallen from a level matching the average of the top half of OECD countries in the early 1990s to 14% below that today. Weak growth, together with rapid population ageing, has driven public debt into uncharted territory. Revitalising growth is thus the top priority for the Japanese government. With the labour force shrinking more rapidly than the population, per capita output can only grow through improvements in labour productivity and labour force participation. Japan’s highly-skilled labour force and its technological leadership can help close the gap with leading OECD countries in per capita income. But broad-based structural reforms, as envisaged in the third arrow of Abenomics, are needed to allow these strengths to fully achieve their potential. The initial impact of Abenomics in 2013 was impressive, and the reform process needs to continue.
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