By Date


  • 23-May-2016

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

    Related Documents
  • 19-May-2016

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, at the G7 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting in Sendai on 19-21 May 2016

    The Secretary-General presented OECD’s recent analysis and recommendations on the world economy, on more balanced and efficient financial markets for growth, and on progress on the international tax system. He also spoke at the G7 High-Level Symposium “Future of the Global Economy”, organised by the Japanese G7 Presidency.

    Related Documents
  • 14-avril-2016

    Français

    Le Japon va revenir au Centre de développement de l'OCDE

    Le Japon, l'un des membres fondateurs du Centre de développement de l'OCDE, a fait part de son intention de faire son retour en tant que membre. Le Premier ministre Shinzo Abe et le ministre des Affaires étrangères Fumio Kishida ont confirmé l'engagement.

    Documents connexes
    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 13-April-2016

    English

    Remarks at Tokyo experts meeting on international finance and the global economy ahead of the G7 Summit

    Prime Minister, Ministers, thank you for the invitation to share with you our thinking on the global economic outlook and the challenges ahead.

  • 12-April-2016

    English, PDF, 176kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Japan

    Japan is ranked 23rd among the 34 OECD member countries in decreasing order with a tax wedge of 32.2% for an average single worker in 2015, compared with the OECD average of 35.9%. The country occupied the same position in 2014.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Japan’s demographic and policy challenges in 5 charts - Insights blog

    Look at Japan and you see the future of many OECD countries. Extreme demographic shifts are re-sculpting the country in dramatic ways, defining future challenges and demanding new policy responses. Blog by Bill Below, on the challenges faced and the opportunities available.

    Related Documents
  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Press conference remarks on the report "Japan: Boosting Growth and Well-being in an Ageing Society"

    Japan has already taken some bold and determined steps in recent years to tackle its economic, social and environmental challenges. But broad-based reforms across a range of areas are still needed.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Launch of the 2016 OECD Territorial Review of Japan

    Japan's commitment to territorial development will be crucial in tackling the urgent challenge of population ageing and shrinking – a challenge which is the main focus of this report.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Seminar with Japanese business leaders on "Global Economic Challenges and the Way Forward with Promoting Diversity"

    Women represent a vast untapped resource for Japan. Their employment rate in 2014 was fully 18 percentage points below that of men. Closing that gap is particularly urgent for Japan: the total population in Japan has already begun to fall and is projected to decline by almost 25% by 2050. Moreover, the share of the elderly (65+) is projected to rise from around 26% today to almost 40% at mid-century.

  • 11-April-2016

    English

    Japan: Boosting Growth and Well-being in an Ageing Society

    With 25 years of sluggish economic growth, Japan’s per capita income has fallen from a level matching the average of the top half of OECD countries in the early 1990s to 14% below that today. Weak growth, together with rapid population ageing, has driven public debt into uncharted territory. Revitalising growth is thus the top priority for the Japanese government. With the labour force shrinking more rapidly than the population, per capita output can only grow through improvements in labour productivity and labour force participation. Japan’s highly-skilled labour force and its technological leadership can help close the gap with leading OECD countries in per capita income. But broad-based structural reforms, as envisaged in the third arrow of Abenomics, are needed to allow these strengths to fully achieve their potential. The initial impact of Abenomics in 2013 was impressive, and the reform process needs to continue.

  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 > >>