Reports


  • 24-November-2015

    English

    Education at a Glance 2015: Italy

    The 2015 edition introduces more detailed analysis of participation in early childhood and tertiary levels of education. The report also examines first generation tertiary-educated adults’ educational and social mobility, labour market outcomes for recent graduates, and participation in employer-sponsored formal and/or non-formal education.

  • 4-November-2015

    English, PDF, 230kb

    Health at a Glance 2015: Key findings for Italy

    Growth in health spending per capita in real terms has been negative in Italy since 2011, with both public and private health spending showing continuous falls. Cuts in pharmaceutical spending have contributed to reductions in health spending. The rise in the share of the generic market has helped to reduce prices and spending on pharmaceuticals in Italy, but still the generic market share remains relatively low.

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  • 4-November-2015

    English, PDF, 468kb

    Health at a Glance 2015: Key findings for Italy - In Italian

    La spesa sanitaria pro-capite in Italia è diminuita in termini reali a partire dal 2011. La diminuzione ha interessato sia la spesa pubblica che quella privata. La riduzione della spesa sanitaria è stata in parte il risultato di tagli alla spesa farmaceutica.

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  • 7-juillet-2015

    Français

    Statistiques de l'OCDE sur la santé 2015 - Notes par pays

    Base de données Statistiques de l'OCDE sur la santé 2015 - Notes par pays

    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 6-July-2015

    English

    Government at a Glance 2015: Country factsheets

    A dashboard of key government indicators by country, to help you analyse international comparisons of public sector performance.

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  • 21-May-2015

    English, PDF, 840kb

  • 12-May-2015

    English, PDF, 38kb

    Tackling harmful alcohol use: Italy

    Levels of alcohol consumption in Italy are among the lowest in the OECD, and have been declining steadily in the past 30 years. In 2010, an average of 6.1 litres of pure alcohol per capita was consumed in Italy, compared with an estimate of 9 litres in the OECD.

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    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 19-February-2015

    English, PDF, 2,804kb

    Structural Reforms in Italy: Impact on Growth and Employment

    To improve Italy’s long-term growth prospects, comprehensive structural reforms are needed to boost competitiveness and support job creation. Drawing on the OECD Economic Survey of Italy 2015, this paper provides a snapshot of the government’s reform agenda and assesses the impact on productivity, employment and GDP of the reforms that have been introduced since 2012.

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  • 9-February-2015

    English, PDF, 98kb

    Going for growth 2015 - Italy

    This country note from Going for Growth 2015 for Italy identifies and assesses progress made on key reforms to boost long-term growth, improve competitiveness and productivity and create jobs.

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  • 15-January-2015

    English

    OECD Reviews of Health Care Quality: Italy 2014 - Raising Standards

    This report reviews the quality of health care in Italy, seeks to highlight best practices, and provides a series of targeted assessments and recommendations for further improvements to quality of care. Italy’s indicators of health system outcomes, quality and efficiency are uniformly impressive. Life expectancy is the fifth highest in the OECD. Avoidable admission rates are amongst the very best in the OECD, and case-fatality after stroke or heart attack are also well below OECD averages. These figures, however, mask profound regional differences. Five times as many children in Sicily are admitted to hospital with an asthma attack than in Tuscany, for example. Despite this, quality improvement and service redesign have taken a back-seat as the fiscal crisis has hit. Fiscal consolidation has become an over-riding priority, even as health needs rapidly evolve. Italy must urgently prioritise quality of its health care services alongside fiscal sustainability. Regional differences must be lessened, in part by giving central authorities a greater role in supporting regional monitoring of local performance. Proactive, coordinated care for people with complex needs must be delivered by a strengthened primary care sector. Fundamental to each of these steps will be ensuring that the knowledge and skills of the health care workforce are best matched to needs.

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