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  • 16-September-2019

    English

    Launch of the 2019 Economic Survey of Iceland

    Over the past years, favourable external conditions and good macroeconomic policies helped Iceland to nurture high growth, low unemployment, low inflation, and sustainable public finances. Living standards are among the highest in the OECD.

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  • 16-September-2019

    English

    Iceland’s slowdown underlines the need to fix structural issues

    Sound macroeconomic policies and favourable external conditions have enabled Iceland’s economy to emerge stronger from a decade of post-crisis management. Yet the impact on growth from a drop in tourist arrivals and seafood exports underlines the need for reforms to open up and diversify the economy and improve its resiliency to sectoral shocks, according to the latest OECD Economic Survey of Iceland.

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  • 13-September-2019

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Reykjavik on 15-16 September 2019

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, will be in Reykjavik on 15-16 September 2019 to present the 2019 OECD Economic Survey of Iceland, alongside Mr. Bjarni Benediktsson, Minister of Finance and Economic Affairs, and Ms. Lilja Alfredsdottir, Minister of Education, Science and Culture of Iceland.

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  • 11-April-2019

    English, PDF, 463kb

    Taxing Wages: Key findings for Iceland

    The tax wedge for the average single worker in Iceland increased by 0.1 percentage points from 33.1 in 2017 to 33.2 in 2018. The OECD average tax wedge in 2018 was 36.1 (2017, 36.2).

  • 14-February-2019

    English

    Making Dispute Resolution More Effective - MAP Peer Review Report, Iceland (Stage 1) - Inclusive Framework on BEPS: Action 14

    Under Action 14, countries have committed to implement a minimum standard to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of the mutual agreement procedure (MAP). The MAP is included in Article 25 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and commits countries to endeavour to resolve disputes related to the interpretation and application of tax treaties. The Action 14 Minimum Standard has been translated into specific terms of reference and a methodology for the peer review and monitoring process. The minimum standard is complemented by a set of best practices.  The peer review process is conducted in two stages. Stage 1 assesses countries against the terms of reference of the minimum standard according to an agreed schedule of review. Stage 2 focuses on monitoring the follow-up of any recommendations resulting from jurisdictions' stage 1 peer review report. This report reflects the outcome of the stage 1 peer review of the implementation of the Action 14 Minimum Standard by Iceland.
  • 21-January-2019

    English

    Aid at a glance charts

    These ready-made tables and charts provide for snapshot of aid (Official Development Assistance) for all DAC Members as well as recipient countries and territories. Summary reports by regions (Africa, America, Asia, Europe, Oceania) and the world are also available.

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  • 5-December-2018

    English, PDF, 409kb

    Revenue Statistics: Key findings for Iceland

    The tax-to-GDP ratio in Iceland decreased by 13.9 percentage points, from 51.6% in 2016 to 37.7% in 2017. This decrease was due to the one-off stability contributions in 2016. The corresponding figures for the OECD average were an increase of 0.2 percentage points from 34.0% to 34.2% over thesame period.

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  • 4-December-2018

    English, PDF, 546kb

    Good jobs for all in a changing world of work: The new OECD Jobs Strategy – Key findings for Iceland

    The digital revolution, globalisation and demographic changes are transforming labour markets at a time when policy makers are also struggling with slow productivity and wage growth and high levels of income inequality. The new OECD Jobs Strategy provides a comprehensive framework and policy recommendations to help countries address these challenges.

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  • 14-mai-2018

    Français

    Les politiques favorables à la famille constituent l’un des principaux moteurs de la croissance économique

    Il ressort d’un nouveau rapport de l’OCDE que les politiques favorables à la famille mises en place dans les pays nordiques depuis cinquante ans et la hausse du taux d’activité des femmes qui en a découlé ont permis d’augmenter la croissance du PIB par habitant de 10 à 20 %.

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  • 14-May-2018

    English

    Is the Last Mile the Longest? Economic Gains from Gender Equality in Nordic Countries

    Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, commonly known as the Nordic countries, have been leaders in the development of modern family and gender policy, and the explicit promotion of gender equality at home, at work, and in public life. Today, on many measures, they boast some of the most gender-equal labour markets in the OECD.This report shows that improvements in gender equality have contributed considerably to economic growth in the Nordic countries. Increases in female employment alone are estimated to account for anywhere between roughly 0.05 and 0.40 percentage points to average annual GDP per capita growth – equivalent to 3 to 20% of total GDP per capita growth over the past 50 years or so, depending on the country.The Nordic countries are closer than most to achieving gender equality in the labour market. But the last mile may well prove to be the longest one. To make further progress, a continued assessment of the effectiveness of existing public policies and workplace practices is needed. Only with resolve and a continued focus can Nordic countries ensure that men and women contribute to their economies and societies in gender equal measure. 
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