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  • 27-March-2020

    English

    Strengthening the Governance of Skills Systems - Lessons from Six OECD Countries

    The governance of skills systems has always raised a number of challenges for governments. Being at the intersection of education, labour market, industrial and other policy domains, managing skills policies is inherently complex. Addressing these challenges is more than ever crucial as globalisation, technological progress and demographic change are putting daunting pressures on skills systems to ensure that all members of society are equipped with the skills necessary to thrive in a rapidly changing world. Strengthening the Governance of Skills Systems: Lessons from Six OECD Countries provides advice on how to make the governance of skills systems effective. Building on the OECD Skills Strategy 2019, which identified four main challenges of skills systems governance, the report presents examples of how six different countries (Estonia, Germany, Korea, Norway, Portugal and the United States) have responded to one or several of these challenges. It also outlines concrete policy recommendations together with a self-assessment tool which provides guidance to policy makers and stakeholders for designing better skills systems that deliver better skills outcomes.
  • 26-March-2020

    English

    The Irish Government Economic and Evaluation Service - Using Evidence-Informed Policy Making to Improve Performance

    This report presents a study of the Irish Government Economic and Evaluation Service (IGEES). The IGEES seeks to improve policy formulation and implementation by providing and building economic and analytical expertise across the Irish civil service. Based on international best practices, the study analyses the extent to which IGEES has contributed to a greater use of evidence-informed policy making in Ireland. It provides an overview of the service’s achievements and remaining challenges and makes recommendations for the future.
  • 24-March-2020

    English

    Use of Open Government Data in response to the coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak

    A call for evidence on the release and use of Open Government Data (OGD) in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

  • 23-March-2020

    English

    Trade in Counterfeit Pharmaceutical Products

    This report, one in a series of studies by the OECD and the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO), enhances understanding of the issues and challenges facing governments, businesses and society posed by the trade in fake pharmaceutical products. Illicit markets for fake pharmaceuticals are attractive for counterfeiters, given the high profit margins, low risks of detection and prosecution, weak penalties, and the ease with which consumers can be deceived into believing that the counterfeit products are genuine. Counterfeit medicines not only cause economic damage for the sector, but are also a significant threat to public health, since fake medicines are often not properly formulated and may contain dangerous ingredients. Fake pharmaceuticals include antibiotics, lifestyle treatments, pain killers, anti-malarial drugs, diabetes treatments and central nervous system medicines.
  • 20-March-2020

    English

    Government at a Glance: Latin America and the Caribbean 2020

    This third edition of Government at a Glance Latin America and the Caribbean provides the latest available evidence on public administrations and their performance in the LAC region and compares it to OECD countries. This publication includes indicators on public finances and economics, public employment, centres of government, regulatory governance, open government data, public sector integrity, public procurement and for the first time core government results (e.g. trust, inequality reduction). Governance indicators are especially useful for monitoring and benchmarking governments' progress in their public sector reforms. Each indicator in the publication is presented in a user-friendly format, consisting of graphs and/or charts illustrating variations across countries and over time, brief descriptive analyses highlighting the major findings of the data, and a methodological section on the definition of the indicator and any limitations in data comparability.
  • 20-March-2020

    English

    OECD Reviews of Evaluation and Assessment in Education: Serbia

    How can assessment and evaluation policies work together more effectively to improve student outcomes in primary and secondary schools? The country reports in this series analyse major issues facing evaluation and assessment policy to identify improvements that can be made to enhance the quality, equity and efficiency of school education. Serbia’s education system performs well compared to other countries in the Western Balkans. In recent years, there have been improvements in access to education and Serbia has undertaken major institutional reforms to improve teaching and learning. However, a large share of students in Serbia continue to leave school without mastering basic competencies and efforts to achieve educational excellence continue to be jeopardised by limited institutional capacity and low levels of public spending on education. This review, developed in co-operation with UNICEF, provides Serbia with recommendations to help strengthen its evaluation and assessment system to focus on support for student learning. It will be of interest to Serbia, as well as other countries looking to make more effective use of their evaluation and assessment system to improve quality and equity, and result in better outcomes for all students.
  • 6-March-2020

    English

    Transparent and Inclusive Stakeholder Participation through Public Councils in Kazakhstan

    In Kazakhstan, over 200 public councils at national, regional and local levels provide a platform for civil society to voice its opinion on important social issues. This report analyses the legal and policy framework for stakeholder participation in Kazakhstan, and compares public councils' current practices against the requirements set out in regulations. It proposes practical recommendations to improve the legitimacy, transparency and inclusiveness of public councils in carrying out their duties. Recommendations are supported by good practices in both OECD and other countries that enable, improve and innovate stakeholder participation.
  • 6-March-2020

    English

    Review of the Kazakhstan Commission on Access to Information

    The report assesses the enforcement of the Republic of Kazakhstan's law on access to information with a focus on the practices of the Kazakhstan Commission on Access to Information. It benchmarks the Commission’s mandate and functions against those of similar access-to-information oversight bodies in OECD countries. The report compares the legal nature and the institutional structure of these institutions, focusing on the availability and effectiveness of appeal mechanisms. It proposes ways to align the Commission with similar bodies in OECD countries by adopting good practices or revising current legislation.
  • 5-March-2020

    English

    Open, Useful and Re-usable data (OURdata) Index: 2019

    This paper presents and discusses the general findings and key policy messages of the 2019 OECD Open, Useful and Re-usable data (OURdata) Index, and provides a detailed analysis of the results for each pillar and sub-pillar. Additionally, it assesses the main advancements and challenges related to the design and implementation of open government data (OGD) policies in OECD member and partner countries by comparing the results for 2019 with those of the 2017 edition. This policy paper contributes to the OECD work on the digital transformation of the public sector, including digital government and data-driven public sector and open government data.
  • 2-March-2020

    English

    Enhancing Productivity in UK Core Cities - Connecting Local and Regional Growth

    Core Cities is an association of eleven cities in the UK: Belfast, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham, and Sheffield. Altogether, Core Cities and their surrounding regions account for around one quarter of the UK population and economy. Given their size and assets, Core Cities have the potential to boost national growth. However, unlike second-tier cities in most other large OECD countries, Core Cities have low levels of productivity by national and international standards. With the right policies and sufficient investment in public transport, housing, skills and other key policy areas, Core Cities could become centres of economic activity that pull their regions and the entire UK to higher productivity levels. This report unpacks the causes of low productivity in UK Core Cities and offers policy recommendations for the local and national level to achieve higher productivity and more inclusive growth.
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