By Date


  • 1-June-2016

    English

    Strengthening Anti-corruption and Integrity for Global Productivity, Inclusiveness and Development

    Corruption creates major impediments to inclusive growth and productivity. This paper outlines the OECD’s role in fighting corruption and promoting integrity. It also explains its new strategy for public integrity which provides a guide for a comprehensive and coherent Integrity System.

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  • 31-May-2016

    English

    The Governance of Inclusive Growth

    Public governance can make a broad-based contribution to sound, sustainable and inclusive growth. Aligning public governance tools and processes with the broader objectives of policy making for inclusive growth can help governments deal with the complexities that go hand-in-hand with reconciling growth and inclusiveness. These complexities include setting out a vision, ensuring that policies complement each other and that different parts of government work together towards common goals, and engaging stakeholders to improve effectiveness, delivery and inclusion. After describing the OECD approach to inclusive growth, the report discusses which public governance principles, tools and arrangements can be used, and when, to enable a whole-of-government shift towards inclusive growth.
  • 21-May-2016

    English

    Digital Government in Chile - Strengthening the Institutional and Governance Framework

    This review analyses the governance and institutional framework of digital government in Chile. It is based on the OECD Recommendation on Digital Government Strategies. It first benchmarks the institutional arrangements of ten advanced countries in the field of digital government, assessing their strategies, digital government units or bodies and policy levers, as well as the co-ordination mechanisms in place. The review then provides an in-depth look at the institutional set-up of digital government in Chile. The assessment reveals that the governance of digital government in Chile would benefit from a stronger legal basis, providing the unit leading the work on digital government with a better grounding and the necessary levers to drive the digital transformation of government and public services. Based on this analysis, the OECD advances two alternative recommendations to strengthen the institutional framework of digital government to foster public sector productivity, enhance efficiencies and improve service delivery. The strengths and weaknesses of the alternatives discussed in detail. The review includes a roadmap for the implementation of both alternatives. 
  • 13-May-2016

    English

    Meeting of the Working Group I on Civil Service and Integrity - 18 April 2016

    Meeting of the Working Group I on Civil Service and Integrity - 18 April 2016

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  • 10-May-2016

    English

    Hertie School - OECD Global Expert Survey on Public Infrastructure

    Jointly created by the Hertie School of Governance and the OECD as part of The Governance Report 2016, the Global Expert Survey on Public Infrastructure captures international trends, challenges, and potential solutions from the perspective of infrastructure experts from around the world.

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  • 10-May-2016

    English

    The Governance Report 2016: Governance of Infrastructure

    While infrastructure investment remains a key focus of international efforts to jump start growth in OECD countries and trigger sustainable economic development elsewhere, it presents a range of challenges for policy makers. This report finds that in many cases, it is governance problems rather than financing, that are responsible for sub-optimal outcomes.

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  • 2-May-2016

    English

    Take the money and run: the uses and abuses of political funding

    Blog article asks if our democratic processes are more responsive to the rich than they are to the poor and the middle class?

  • 2-May-2016

    English

    The Implementation of the Palestinian Code of Conduct - Strengthening Ethics and Contributing to Institution-Building

    A set of clear standards of conduct for public officials can provide a critical tool for governments to promote openness, transparency and accountability in the public sector and eventually restore citizens’ trust in government. With a view to strengthening the ethics framework, the Palestinian Authority has undertaken significant progress to implement a Code of Conduct and Ethics for its civil service. This report analyses the underlining factors of an effective Code of Conduct in the overall framework of public governance reform to build open and transparent institutions. The report traces the evolution of the code from the first draft to the adopted document and discusses the final version against OECD recommendations and international good practices. The report provides actionable policy recommendations to operationalise the code towards a stronger governance framework for public sector integrity in the Palestinian Authority. The report points to the code’s strategic role alongside other measures to upgrade the ethics framework and sets an agenda to drive effective implementation in line with international principles of ethics and open government in the Palestinian Authority.
  • 30-April-2016

    English, PDF, 344kb

    Hungary Policy Brief: More Evidence-based Policymaking for Better Results

    In 2010, the Hungarian government started an ambitious public sector reform programme with the aim of modernising its public administration and improve access, responsiveness and quality of public services.

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  • 25-April-2016

    English

    Regulatory Policy in Chile - Government Capacity to Ensure High-Quality Regulation

    One of Chile’s biggest strengths is its very sound macroeconomic framework that reinforces its economic resilience. This is partly based on a prudent regulatory and supervisory framework governing the financial system. Furthermore, the government’s Agenda for Productivity, Innovation and Growth, co-ordinated by the Ministry of Economy with the participation of other ministries and state services, constitutes a good opportunity to use regulatory policy as a driver to reform the policymaking framework of Chile. For example, Chile has already made substantive progress in making regulations more accessible and communicating administrative requirements. However, while in Chile national regulations provide the general framework for administrative procedures and an efficient state administration, the lack of a comprehensive regulatory reform programme has reduced the possibility of achieving even better economic outcomes and unleashing resources to boost productivity. The regulatory policymaking framework lacks some key features seen in other OECD countries (e.g. stakeholder engagement, regulatory impact assessment, oversight body) that would make sure that regulations are designed in the best way. Good practices in rule-making procedures are also rather limited. This review presents the way forward for improving the government’s capacity to ensure high-quality regulation in Chile.
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