Chine


  • 9-February-2016

    English

    Water Governance in Cities - City Profiles

    Compare how cities across the world are shaping up to the challenges of water governance. Analysis includes a range of governance issues including stakeholder engagement, water loss, sanitation and access to drinking water.

    Related Documents
  • 18-April-2015

    English

    OECD Urban Policy Reviews: China 2015

    China needs a new model of urbanisation to match the shift to a new model of growth. For decades, both urbanisation and growth have been based on robust export demand, cheap labour, cheap land and artificially low pricing of environmental externalities. None of these can support growth or urban development in the future. This review examines the major challenges associated with the shift to a new model of urbanisation, looking at a range such issues as social and labour-market policies, land use and transport planning, urban planning, urban governance and public finance. The review presents a new assessment of China’s major cities, which defines functional urban areas based on settlement patterns and commuting zones rather than cities defined as administrative units. The results show, among other things, that China has many more mega-cities, with populations above 10 million, than the official data suggest. The good news for China is that the reforms needed to foster what the authorities call “people-centred urbanisation”, while complex, are coherent with one another and supportive of the broader shift to a growth model that relies more on domestic demand and productivity growth.

  • 18-April-2015

    English

    OECD Urban Policy Reviews: China 2015

    China needs a new model of urbanisation to match the shift to a new model of growth. For decades, both urbanisation and growth have been based on robust export demand, cheap labour, cheap land and artificially low pricing of environmental externalities. None of these can support growth or urban development in the future.

    Related Documents
  • 16-octobre-2013

    Français

    Comment favoriser une urbanisation plus inclusive en Chine

    Alors que l’urbanisation était depuis longtemps freinée en Chine par diverses restrictions appliquées au marché foncier et aux migrations internes, elle s’intensifie depuis que ces obstacles ont commencé à être progressivement levés dans les années 90.

    Also AvailableEgalement disponible(s)
  • 22-March-2011

    English, , 1,741kb

    China’s Emergence as a Market Economy: Achievements and Challenges

    This paper depicts the rapid development and transformation of the Chinese economy so far and discusses how to sustain vigorous and inclusive growth.

    Related Documents
  • 22-March-2011

    Chinese, , 2,272kb

  • 10-February-2011

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Guangdong, China

    This review assesses Guangdong’s current approach to economic development. It is the country’s most populous and rich province with 95.4 million inhabitants and provides one-eighth of the national GDP with "processing trade" as a key development feature.

  • 17-décembre-2010

    Français

    Poursuivre la réforme de la politique monétaire pour accomplir les objectifs domestiques

    Suite à diverses réformes et au développement du secteur financier, la Banque Populaire de Chine (BPdC) contrôle désormais de façon significative les taux d’intérêt du marché monétaire.

    Documents connexes
  • 15-November-2010

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Guangdong, China 2010

    Located on the southern coast of China, Guangdong is the country’s most populous and rich province. It has 95.4 million inhabitants and provides one-eighth of the national GDP. A key development feature of Guangdong has been “processing trade”, which has allowed companies to profit from importing materials, assembling goods and exporting them via Hong Kong, China.

    The recent economic crisis has had a strong impact on the province, although Guangdong also faces in-depth structural problems. Growing labour costs and strain on land availability have increasingly challenged the province’s traditional model of development, as have new competitors in China and abroad. Meanwhile, regional disparities within the province have increased, with a high concentration of economic activities and foreign direct investment in the Pearl River Delta area, an agglomeration of nine prefectures of 47.7 million inhabitants that represents 79.4% of the province’s total GDP.

    This review assesses Guangdong’s current approach to economic development. The province is focusing on industrial policies primarily aimed at heavy manufacturing industries (e.g. automobile, shipbuilding, petrochemicals) and supported by investment in hard infrastructure transport projects and energy supply, along with the implementation of the “Double Relocation” policies intended to move lower value-added factories to lagging regions through incentive mechanisms like industrial parks.

    The review discusses how some principles of the OECD regional paradigm could help Guangdong. It also addresses the huge environmental challenges that the province is facing and explores the opportunity for developing a green growth strategy. Strategies to improve Guangdong’s governance are analysed as well, with particular attention paid to co-ordination issues within the Pearl River Delta.

    The Territorial Review of Guangdong is integrated into a series of thematic reviews on regions undertaken by the OECD Territorial Development Policy Committee. The overall aim of these case studies is to draw and disseminate horizontal policy recommendations for regional and national governments.

     

     

  • 11-November-2009

    Chinese

  • 1 | 2 | 3 > >>