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  • 20-décembre-2018

    Français

    Analyse coûts-avantages et environnement - Avancées théoriques et utilisation par les pouvoirs publics

    La présente publication examine les avancées récentes de l’analyse coûts-avantages (ACA) environnementale. Celle-ci correspond à l’application de l’ACA aux projets ou aux politiques qui visent explicitement à améliorer la qualité de l’environnement ou qui ont, d’une manière ou d’une autre, un effet indirect sur les milieux naturels. Cette publication s’appuie sur l’ouvrage précédent de l’OCDE rédigé par David Pearce et al. (2006), qui partait du constat que la conjonction d’un certain nombre d’avancées de l’ACA modifiait la manière dont bien des économistes recommanderaient de mettre en œuvre cet instrument, surtout dans le contexte de projets ou de politiques ayant des impacts environnementaux considérables.
    Cette publication n’a pas seulement pour principal objectif d’évaluer les progrès accomplis : elle cherche également à déterminer en quoi certaines évolutions illustrent des questions thématiques centrales ayant des conséquences pour l’application concrète de l’ACA environnementale dans le cadre de l’élaboration des politiques et de l’évaluation des projets d’investissement.
    Le thème sans doute le plus important a trait à la contribution de l’économie du climat face au défi que constitue l’évaluation des mesures publiques visant à atténuer le changement climatique (ou à s’y adapter). Les travaux dans ce domaine ont accru l’intérêt porté au mode d’évaluation des coûts et des avantages à très long terme et ils ont notamment montré à quel point les procédures classiques de détermination du taux d’actualisation social deviennent problématiques dans un contexte intergénérationnel et quelles pourraient être les nouvelles approches requises. La contribution de l’économie du climat a également suscité une réflexion plus poussée sur l’incertitude dans le cadre de l’ACA, en particulier en présence d’effets incertains qui peuvent avoir des impacts (négatifs) de grande ampleur.
  • 28-November-2018

    English

    Financing Climate Futures - Rethinking Infrastructure

    Infrastructure worldwide has suffered from chronic under-investment for decades and currently makes up more than 60% of greenhouse gas emissions. A deep transformation of existing infrastructure systems is needed for both climate and development, one that includes systemic conceptual and behavioural changes in the ways in which we manage and govern our societies and economies.This report - a joint effort by the OECD, UN Environment and the World Bank Group, supported by the German Government - focuses on how governments can move beyond the current incremental approach to climate action and more effectively align financial flows with climate and development priorities. The report explores six key transformative areas that will be critical to align financial flows with low-emission and resilient societies (planning, innovation, budgeting, private finance, development finance, and cities) and looks at how rapid socio-economic and technological developments, such as digitalisation, can open new pathways to low-emission, resilient futures.
  • 27-November-2018

    English

    For Good Measure - Advancing Research on Well-being Metrics Beyond GDP

    The 2009 Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress ('Stiglitz-Sen-Fitoussi' Commission) concluded that we should move away from over-reliance on GDP when assessing a country’s health, towards a broader dashboard of indicators that would reflect concerns such as the distribution of well-being and sustainability in all of its dimensions. This book includes contributions from members of the OECD-hosted High Level Expert Group on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress (HLEG), the successor of the Stiglitz-Sen-Fitoussi Commission, on the latest research in this field. These contributions look in some depth at some of the key issues raised by the 2009 Commission, such as how to include the environment and sustainability in our measurement system and how to improve the measurement of different types of inequalities, of economic insecurity, of subjective well-being and of trust. A companion volume Beyond GDP: Measuring What Counts for Economic and Social Performance, presents an overview by the HLEG co-chairs, Joseph E. Stiglitz, Jean-Paul Fitoussi and Martine Durand of the progress accomplished since the 2009 report, of the work conducted by the HLEG over the past five years, and on what still needs to be done.
  • 27-November-2018

    English

    Global Material Resources Outlook to 2060 - Economic Drivers and Environmental Consequences

    This report presents global projections of materials use and their environmental consequences, providing a quantitative outlook to 2060 at the global, sectoral and regional levels for 61 different materials (biomass resources, fossil fuels, metals and non-metallic minerals). It explains the economic drivers determining the decoupling of economic growth and materials use, and assesses how the projected shifts in sectoral and regional economic activity influence the use of different materials. The projections include both primary and secondary materials, which provides a deeper understanding of what drives the synergies and trade-offs between extraction and recycling.The report projects a doubling of global primary materials use between today and 2060. Population and converging per capita income growth drive the growth in materials use. However, structural change, especially in non-OECD countries, and technology improvements partially dampen that growth. Metals and non-metallic minerals are projected to grow more rapidly than other types of materials.
  • 27-November-2018

    English

    Beyond GDP - Measuring What Counts for Economic and Social Performance

    Metrics matter for policy and policy matters for well-being. In this report, the co-chairs of the OECD-hosted High Level Expert Group on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress, Joseph E. Stiglitz, Jean-Paul Fitoussi and Martine Durand, show how over-reliance on GDP as the yardstick of economic performance misled policy makers who did not see the 2008 crisis coming. When the crisis did hit, concentrating on the wrong indicators meant that governments made inadequate policy choices, with severe and long-lasting consequences for many people. While GDP is the most well-known, and most powerful economic indicator, it can’t tell us everything we need to know about the health of countries and societies. In fact, it can’t even tell us everything we need to know about economic performance. We need to develop dashboards of indicators that reveal who is benefitting from growth, whether that growth is environmentally sustainable, how people feel about their lives, what factors contribute to an individual’s or a country’s success. This book looks at progress made over the past 10 years in collecting well-being data, and in using them to inform policies. An accompanying volume, For Good Measure: Advancing Research on Well-being Metrics Beyond GDP, presents the latest findings from leading economists and statisticians on selected issues within the broader agenda on defining and measuring well-being.
  • 26-November-2018

    English

    Multi-dimensional Review of Thailand (Volume 2) - In-depth Analysis and Recommendations

    Thailand is a fast emerging country that aspires to become a high-income economy by 2037. Still, Thailand’s growth path has created large disparities that risk obstructing the next stage of development. This report lays out three transitions that Thailand needs to master to build capabilities and sustain faster but also more inclusive economic growth. First, the country should move from a growth path dominated by few and geographically concentrated sources of innovation to one that focuses on unlocking the full potential of all regions. Second, to support a new growth agenda, it should organise multi-level governance and the relationship between the many layers of government more effectively, particularly with regards to financial resources. Last but not least, Thailand should focus on water and environment, moving from a resource-intensive growth path with costly natural disasters to one characterised by sustainable development. In the case of water, this means moving from ad-hoc responses to effective management of water security.
  • 22-November-2018

    English

    Managing the Water-Energy-Land-Food Nexus in Korea - Policies and Governance Options

    This report assesses the key bottlenecks within the water-energy-land-food nexus in Korea, and proposes policy recommendations and governance arrangements to future-proof environmental integrity and enhance sustainable growth. The increasing pressure caused by urbanisation, industrialisation, population growth and climate change in Korea has led to more land consumption and augmented water supply, at the expense of the environment and at a high cost for public finance. Korea has engaged with the OECD via a national policy dialogue to explore best practices from the wider international community to better manage the nexus at the river basin scale. 
  • 20-November-2018

    English

    Human Acceleration of the Nitrogen Cycle - Managing Risks and Uncertainty

    This publication examines the risks associated with the release of excessive nitrogen into the environment (climate change, depletion of the ozone layer, air pollution, water pollution, loss of biodiversity, deterioration of soil quality). The report also highlights the uncertainty associated with the ability of nitrogen to move from one ecosystem to another and cause 'cascading effects'. In addition to better management of nitrogen risks at the local level, there is a need to consider the global risks associated with the continued increase in nitrous oxide concentrations and to prevent excess nitrogen in all its forms by developing cost-effective strategies for all its sources. Other than the reduction of nitrogen pollution, this report provides guidance on the use of nitrogen policy instruments and how to ensure coherence with objectives such as food security, energy security and environmental objectives.
  • 13-November-2018

    English

    Forum on Green Finance and Investment

    13-14 November 2018, OECD Paris - The OECD Centre on Green Finance and Investment is pleased to announce the 5th Forum on Green Finance and Investment on the theme "Aligning financial flow and infrastructure with climate objectives and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)".

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  • 12-November-2018

    English

    Third Meeting of the Roundtable on Financing Water

    12 November, OECD Paris - The Roundtable will focus on the three main pillars of analytical work: Mapping financing flows (characterising investment needs and financing capacities at country level); Blended finance for water investments (developing good practice in the use of development finance ) and Strategic investment pathways (designing investments in terms of water security and sustainable growth).

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