Latest Documents


  • 6-December-2016

    English

    Back to Work: United States - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is part of a series of nine reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that the United States has a relatively high rate of job displacement and that only one in two affected workers find a new job within one year. Older displaced workers and those with a low level of education fare worst. Contrary to most other OECD countries, displaced workers have long been a target group for policy intervention, and a number of system features, like rapid response services, are promising. But the success of US policies is limited because overall funding for the workforce development system is insufficient and because only trade-related job displacement comes with generous entitlement for training and better benefits.

  • 24-November-2016

    English

    Back to Work: Finland - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less  and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is part of a series of nine reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that Finland has a higher rate of job displacement than most OECD countries but that most of these workers find a new job again relatively quickly. However, those who do not face a considerable risk of long-term unemployment; with older displaced workers and those with a low level of education facing the highest risk. While labour market institutions in Finland serve most displaced jobseekers well, there is room to improve policies for those at risk of long-term unemployment or inactivity who would benefit from earlier identification of their problems and early, effective and well-targeted counselling and intervention.

  • 28-October-2016

    English

    Connecting People with Jobs: The Labour Market, Activation Policies and Disadvantaged Workers in Slovenia

    Giving people better opportunities to participate actively in the labour market improves well-being. It also helps countries to cope with rapid population ageing by mobilising more fully each country’s potential labour resources. However, weak labour market attachment of some groups in society reflects a range of barriers to working or moving up the jobs ladder. This report on Slovenia is the second country study published in a series of reports looking into how activation policies can encourage greater labour market participation of all groups in society with a special focus on the most disadvantaged. Labour market and activation policies are well developed in Slovenia. However, the global financial crisis hit Slovenia hard and revealed some structural weaknesses in the system, which have contributed to a high level of long-term unemployment and low employment rates for some groups. This report on Slovenia therefore focuses on activation policies to improve labour market outcomes for four groups: long-term unemployed people; low-skilled workers; older workers; and workers who were made or are at risk of becoming displaced. There is room to improve policies through promoting longer working lives and through enabling the Employment Service and related institutions to help more harder-to-place jobseekers back into employment.

  • 7-October-2016

    English

    Defining “green skills” using data

    New research finds that green jobs use high-level cognitive and interpersonal skills more intensively compared to non-green jobs, and tend to be less routinized. They are also heterogeneous in terms of skill level.

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  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Structural Transformation in the OECD: Digitalisation, Deindustrialisation and the Future of Work

    This working paper examines the impact of technological change on labour market outcomes since the computer revolution of the 1980s, and recent developments in digital technology – including machine learning and robotics – and their potential impacts on the future of work.

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  • 30-September-2016

    English

    Some well-known (and some lesser-known) facts about digitalisation, deindustrialisation and the future of work

    The OECD has just released a new working paper by Thor Berger and Carl Frey which provides a systematic overview of the literature examining the impact of digitalisation on labour markets. The paper highlights some well-known as well as some lesser-known facts about digitalisation, deindustrialisation and the future of work.

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  • 13-September-2016

    English

    Italy’s skills and labour market challenges in an ageing society

    Low birth rates have become a pressing issue in Italy and many young Italians feel they do not enjoy the necessary economic stability to plan ahead and start a family. Education that matches the skill needs of employers leading to work-based learning in the form of apprenticeships can be useful to help young Italians plan ahead and to sustain the much needed increase in the birth rate.

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  • 25-août-2016

    Français

    Perspectives de l'emploi de l'OCDE 2016

    L’édition 2016 des Perspectives de l’emploi de l’OCDE propose un examen approfondi de l’évolution récente du marché du travail et de ses perspectives à court terme dans les pays de l'OCDE. Le chapitre 1 propose une vue d’ensemble des évolutions récentes du marché du travail en s’intéressant en particulier aux jeunes les plus vulnérables qui sont peu qualifiés, déscolarisés, sans emploi et ne suivant aucune formation. Ce groupe a augmenté ces dernières années dans plusieurs pays de l’OCDE et les gouvernements devront prendre des mesures efficaces s’ils veulent arriver à l’objectif récemment adopté par les pays du G20 de réduire de 15 % la part des jeunes vulnérables d’ici à 2025. Le chapitre 2 s’intéresse à l’utilisation des compétences au travail : les pays font-ils suffisamment pour s’assurer que les travailleurs sont à même de faire pleinement usage de leurs compétences au travail ? Le chapitre 3 étudie les effets à court terme des réformes structurelles sur l’emploi et identifie les stratégies réussies qui permettent de réduire les coûts de transition. Le chapitre 4 examine la façon de réduire les disparités entre hommes et femmes sur le marché du travail dans les économies émergentes et propose une réponse politique globale à ce problème. Une annexe statistique complète les analyses et recommandations présentées dans ce rapport.

     

  • 29-July-2016

    English

    Gender gaps in emerging economies: the role of skills

    Despite unprecedented progress over the past century, gender gaps in the labour market persist throughout the emerging world and are accompanied by important skill gaps. Women tend to perform worse in STEM subjects, have lower financial literacy and business knowledge than men. The OECD Employment Outlook 2016 paints an up-to-date picture of gender gaps in 16 emerging economies and outlines a comprehensive set of policy recommendations.

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  • 21-July-2016

    English, PDF, 1,166kb

    Enhancing employability, G20 Report

    Skill requirements are changing rapidly as a result of structural shifts. Workforce employability is essential to turn structural change into an opportunity for all. Education and training systems, labour markets, workers and workplaces will have to become more adaptable. A set of concrete actionable measures is proposed to improve the employability of each economy’s workforce.

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