By Date


  • 10-February-2015

    English

    G20: Remarks for Session 2 - Framework for Strong, Sustainable and Balanced Growth

    We therefore need a “copernician” change in our approach to the growth – inequality nexus: let’s not think growth first, and inequality thereafter but let’s consider both of them, together, in their circularity. In other words, let’s think “Inclusive Growth”, right from the start, and let’s make it another touchstone of our efforts and complement the Pittsburgh tryptic of strong, sustainable and balanced growth!

  • 9-February-2015

    English

    OECD’s 2015 Going for Growth: Breaking the vicious circle

    Going for Growth is the OECD’s flagship report on structural policies. The purpose of Going for Growth is to help governments setting a reform agenda to improve citizens’ well-being. It has been instrumental in helping G20 countries to develop growth strategies to raise their combined gross domestic product (GDP) by 2% over baseline projections by 2018 – as agreed by G20 Leaders in Brisbane last year.

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  • 3-February-2015

    English

    Review: The co-operative model in Trentino (Italy) - A case study

    The Trentino co-operative model has gained wide acclaim for its positive economic and social impact upon the territory. Developing a strong understanding of why the model has been so effective is important in identifying those factors which other localities could utilise as potential criticalities.

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  • 19-January-2015

    English

    Japan can do more to encourage smooth transition of laid-off workers back into jobs, says OECD

    Japan could help laid-off workers find a job more quickly by improving co-ordination between public employment services and companies, as well as ensuring that all workers benefit from adequate Employment Insurance (EI) benefits, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 19-January-2015

    English

    Back to Work: Japan - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over the course of their working lives. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in the jobs they held prior to displacement. Helping displaced workers get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is the second in a series of reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that Japanese employers and the government go to considerable lengths to avoid the displacement of regular workers while also providing considerable income and re-employment support to many of the workers whose jobs cannot be preserved. Challenges for labour market programmes include expanding labour market mobility between regular jobs, improving co-ordination between private and public re-employment assistance for displaced workers, and avoiding that job displacement pushes older workers to the margins of the labour market.
  • 31-December-2014

    English

    Project: Building Statistical Evidence to understand Local Labour Market Differentiation and Support more effective Policies

    The main objective of this project is to gather evidence on local labour markets, in particular on skills supply and demand, employment and productivity.

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  • 16-December-2014

    English

    Recruiting Immigrant Workers: Austria 2014

    Austria has low levels of labour migration from non-EU/EFTA countries. At the same time, intra-EU free mobility has grown significantly and since 2011, overall migration for employment is above the OECD average. It recently reformed its labour migration system, making it more ready to accept labour migrants where they are needed, especially in medium-skilled occupations in which there were limited admission possibilities previously. This publication analyses the reform and the Austrian labour migration management system in international comparison.
  • 10-décembre-2014

    Français

    Les grands enjeux des 50 prochaines années

    Cette étude analyse quelques-uns des problèmes clés auxquels les pays de l’OCDE et leurs partenaires pourraient être confrontés dans les 50 prochaines années si les grandes tendances mondiales se confirment en matière de croissance, d’échanges, d’inégalités et de pressions environnementales.

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  • 9-décembre-2014

    Français

  • 8-décembre-2014

    Français

    La stagnation économique aggrave les pressions démographiques qui s'exercent sur les systèmes de retraite, selon l'OCDE

    La lenteur de la croissance, le bas niveau des taux d'intérêt et la faiblesse des rendements des placements liés à la léthargie de l'économie mondiale sont en train d'aggraver les problèmes de vieillissement démographique auxquels sont confrontés les systèmes de retraite tant publics que privés, selon un nouveau rapport de l'OCDE.

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